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K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 2011.8.19
    Specified date
    ○ The origin of Korean milkware can be found from the casting of bronze ware, and the manufacturing method of this milkware is divided into bangjja milk made from a single (dudrim) and casting made from a mold (moor on a frame).

    Bangjjayugi, also known as Hyangdong, is made of traditional musical instruments or tableware, and casting yugi is made by using molds called chudong.

    ○ Park Gap-sul has been engaged in foundry organic production for more than 50 years and maintains the tradition of traditional casting abandonment by producing and taking part in the traditional cloud-style spinning frame, which is disappearing, so it is necessary to preserve the tradition.
  • 2000.8.21
    designated date
    It is a miscellaneous song sung in Seoul and Gyeonggi Province, and is classified as a sitcom because a singer sits down and sings alone. The name Japga is given in the relative meaning of the list price of aristocrats. There are "Ginjapga" and "Whistlejapga." There are 12 songs in "Ginjapga," which is also called "12japga." It occurred in the mid-19th century and was widely sung among the singers of the Four Seasons in Cheongpa-dong, Seoul.

    In the past, eight jagga were divided into eight jagga and jagga, including "Yusanga," "Jeokbyeokga" and "Jebi," "Housewife's Song," "Sochunhyangga," "Seonyoga," "Hyeongjangga," "Pyongyangga," and other jagga. jagga includes "Dalgeori," "Sipjangga," "Bangga," "Bangga," "Bangga," and "Bangga."

    It is believed that the ginjapga was originally modeled after yangban's Jeongga, which is why the characteristics of Jeongga and folk songs are mixed together. In terms of the prior art, the biggest feature is that the sound tones of Gyeonggi and Seodo are mixed. In terms of rhythm, Yushan, Sochunhyangga, Pyeongyangga, Seonyu, Songga, Sipjanga, Bangmulga, Jipjanga, and Hyungjanga are accompanied by Dodi rhythm, and Dalgori is mixed with Doddri and Semachi. The musical form of a japga is a form in which the floor is connected in parallel. If the size of the floor is constant, it can be seen in a fluid form, and if the size of the floor is irregular, it can be seen in a modified oil form. The lyrics of the long japga are often lyrical or pick a passage from pansori.

    "Ginjapga" is considered one of the representative art music in Gyeonggi Province. Musically, it is a masterpiece that combines the strengths of Jeongga and folk songs, and is a mixture of Gyeonggi and Seodo music. These characteristics can be called the cultural identity of the long-term job.
  • 2000.8.21
    Designated date
    Paju area is located in the northwestern part of Gyeonggi-do and is influenced by the neighboring Hwanghae-do culture to form a unique culture. In the Geumsan-ri area of Paju, various rice paddies and funeral ritual songs were handed down, and cultural assets were designated under the name of Paju Geumsan-ri Folk Song. Eight types of rice paddies and three types of funeral rituals are handed down in Geumsan-ri.

    When farming rice paddies, they sprinkle rice seeds on the seedbed to a certain extent and when they grow up, they pull out their teeth and plant them in the rice paddies, and because they say "I gained hair," they sing "I gained weight" with the chorus. In the process of transplanting the rice seedlings, the song is called "Hana Sori," meaning planting the rice seedlings one by one.

    The mother-in-law of the rice paddy was held about a month later, while the first rice paddy was made of hoeum, and the second, two bees, and the third, Samdong, were hand-tied. In this area, the popular folk songs 'Yangsando' and 'Bangataryeong' were included in the rice paddies. Yangsan-do is called 'Non Kim Yang-san-do' as 'Yangsan-do' is called 'Non Kim Yang-san-do' at this time. In addition, they sing "hehehehehehehehehehehehehehehehehe" The word 'body stone' means to turn your body around and tie the rice paddies. After the rice paddies are finished, the song is called "Uyasori" to chase birds, which is meant to prevent evil and pray for a good harvest.

    In the funeral song, there are the sound of "Uegeori Overpass" and "Uhsori," and the sound of the tomb's ironing is called "Dalgusori." In addition to the dalgu sound, the hoe-daji is also sung with non-maggi sounds such as Bangataryeong, Sangsasori, and Uyasori, which is a common tradition in Gyeonggi-do.

    Currently, the festival is actively carrying out performances and transmission activities, focusing on the preservation of agricultural songs in Geumsan-ri, Paju, and the Chu Gyo-jeon, the owner of folk songs in Geumsan-ri, Paju.
  • 2000.8.21
    designated date
    Hyangdangmu in Anseong refers to a traditional dance that originated from the Akga Muhak Training Center in Anseong, Gyeonggi-do. The origin of Hyangdangmu is several, including the theory that the descendants of the willow baby, a government official of the Geuknu Pavilion, which was built to commemorate the victory after the reign of King Gongmin of the Goryeo Dynasty, danced in honor of its spirit. The village ritual, dongje, Sadangpae nori, and dances performed by government officials and frauds in Anseong and Jincheon area have been performed in the area. The dancers were mainly composed of Jae-in, Gisaeng, and Min-cho, but considering the terms of dance in Chinese characters and the terms comparing the geographical names, it can be said that they joined the literati as well as the literati.

    There are about 40 kinds of dances handed down from Hyangdangmu in Anseong, which are divided into masculine and feminine dances according to their personality. Thirteen types of hwarangmu, including Gyeongcheon Barye Mu, Bonghwang Geumran Mu, pray for the prosperity of the king's Mansumu River and the royal family, and Jang Gummu, Gungmu Samu, and Dosan Muryeong, are regarded as masculine hwarangmu lineage.

    On the other hand, 15 kinds of dances, including Hakkwa dance, which is performed with a white towel, Hongaeksugeon dance, which expresses a woman's sorrow, and Chae Seonhyang dance, which performs various techniques and dances according to the Sanjo song with a fan, as well as Buddhist dance, Buddhist dance, and Gomyeong dance, have been handed down to the gisaengs in Anseong area.

    The accompaniment music of Hyangdangmu in Anseong is divided into court music, folk music, sanjo and military music, and the dance moves are diverse and difficult. The dance content and entertainment vary depending on the status because it is a dance that has a lot of different people using martial arts.

    In 1990, Hyangdangmu, which was discovered by local residents including Anseong Cultural Center, was designated as an intangible cultural asset by Yi Seok-dong and Yu Cheong-ja as an assistant administrator in 2000. Yi Seok-dong's deceased Hu Cheong-ja is serving as the chairman of the Preservation Society and is striving to succeed Anseong Hyangdangmu.
  • 2000.8.21
    designated date
    Pocheon Menari is an agricultural labor song that was sung when rice paddies were being dug in the area of Shingyeong-myeon, Pocheon-si, Gyeonggi-do. Although there are many kinds of labor songs in Pocheon, the rice wine that was sung during rice paddies was very unique, and the song was named Pocheon Menari by tying up Pocheon's labor songs.

    Menari is a song that is widely sung in Gangwon-do. In Gangwon-do, it is usually sung with switchpoles, yunchang, and solo songs, and Pocheon's Menari is used to sing in five groups. Menari is also used in music studies as a form of music in the eastern part of the Korean Peninsula.

    Pocheon Menari consists of the process of farming. There are jajinari and jigae, which are sung by farmers when they climb up the mountain to pick up the ribs, and "jiggwong," which are sung as they come down the mountain with a load on the fork, and "hojiri" as a screeching sound when they drive cattle and go to the rice field. It is the Hanasori family, which is widely known in Gyeonggi Province for its 'Yeolsori' during planting. The first rice paddies, "Ahnon Maggie," are called ho mi, when they sing "Gianta-ryeong" and "Banga-taryeong" (Ggotbang-at-ryeong) and "Kkot-taryeong" are sung at the end of the rice paddies. The second non-magazine, Dubeol Maggie, steals by hand, and sings 'Menari.'

    Menari is a different style of singing than Menari in other regions. Singers are to be grouped into five groups: the sound of singing, the sound of shouting, the sound of receiving, the sound of making, and the sound of forming. For example, if you look at the way a musical instrument is divided, it is divided into the form of 'Sound: This rice paddy is good / Screaming / Sound: Sound of water / Sound of forming: Good'.
  • 2017.8.24
    August 24th Register of Intangible Cultural Heritage of the City and City
    "Jeju Island warrant sound" refers to a funeral ritual song called in Jeju Island, especially "a warrant" meaning "a funeral" throughout Jeju Island.
  • 2017.8.24
    Designated date
    "Jeju-do warrant sound" is a term referring to funeral ceremonies called in Jeju-do, especially "warrant" is a Jeju word meaning "funeral" throughout Jeju-do.
  • 2006.8.24
    designated date
    A jade burial refers to a craftsmanship or craftsman who grinds jade to make various ornaments and objects. The jade was used as an ornament to symbolize the virtues of phosphorus, righteousness, paper, dragon, and angle, and was used in many ways, including walls, bells, regulations, jang, ho, Hwang, and other weapons, instruments such as Okgyeong, medicinal materials, and medical supplies. The jade had great pavilions and pavilions, and the good jade was rare, making it difficult to secure materials. The process of making jade is largely divided into six stages: quarrying, drawing, cutting, molding, carving, and polishing. The jade court should have a high level of artistry, along with an accurate prediction when designing jade pickings and gemstones, and skilled techniques for delicate and elaborate sculptures.

    On Aug. 17, 2006 eomik been recognition of activity in the holder of the character.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb
  • 2017.8.24
    designated date
    Kim Eun-sook was granted a ritual for the construction of Goje Yageum and a charnel house by Jeong Dal-yeong, the holder of the National Intangible Cultural Property No. 23. Jeong Dal-yeong's Gayageum Sanjo and Byeongchang, a member of the Hansuk family, were passed down to Kang Jeong-yeol after his death in 1997.

    Kim Eun-sook has been working on preserving, inheriting, and developing the Goje Gayageum Byeongchang, which was introduced in the southern part of the country, by performing music and training disciples in Gwangju and South Jeolla Province after Kang Jeong-yeol.
  • 1987.8.25
    Designated date
    Nongak is the music originally played by farmers when they work with Du-re (an organization for community work) and refers to the music played by percussion instruments such as gonggwari, gong, and janggu drum.

    Honam Udo Nongak is a nongak developed around the western plains of Jeollanam-do. Especially, nongak played in Yeonggwang area is based on the nongak of the Ministry of Patriots and Veterans Affairs.

    Nongak, or nongak, is a traditional folk music handed down from Yeonggwang, Mujang (Gochang), Jangseong, and Hampyeong. The late Choi Hwa-jip, who lived as a general, is the first to continue the tradition.

    The organization of the nongak troupe consists of representative instruments, nong porcelain ryeonggi (令旗), trumpet, iron lead, iron, gong, janggu, drum, sogo, and variegated nori. The gestures are varied and glamorous, and it is said to be a masterpiece.

    The mixed colors of Yeonggwang Udo Nongak are the only ones in the country to wear a wooden mask made by hand using paulownia wood, and enjoy folk plays and playing with banquets. In particular, the late Jeon Kyung-hwan was also excellent in the art of decapitation. When you were working on your throat, you called in Mr. Moon Han-joon and worked with him manually, and the technology and equipment are now owned by Mr. Moon Han-joon. There are a total of 10 types of masks, including Daeposu, Yangban, Chambong, Halmi, Cooking, Biricho, and Hongjeoksam.

    In early January (Jeongwol), the ritual for village guardian deity is held, and the ritual for village guardian deity (Sam) and village cheonryonggut are performed, and the ritual for village guardian deity is performed to drive out disaster to the family and pray for happiness. Among them, Sangsoe nori and Seoljanggu nori are outstanding.

    Currently, Udo Nongak is recognized as the owner of entertainment shows such as Sangsoe Moon Han-joon and Seoljanggu Kim Dong-eon.
  • 1987.8.25
    Designated date
    The roots of our culture began with shamanism and pungmulnori. The drumming originated from Pungmulnori, which is the oldest play, and the sound and dance are in exquisite harmony.

    Buknori has its own characteristics depending on the region. In Jeolla-do, it is divided into Oebukchigi and Yangbukchigi. Oebukchigi is a common form of Jeolla-do, and Yangbukchigi is handed down only to Jindo.

    Unlike ordinary out-of-the-way games, Jindo drum nori starts with a slow gutgeori, jajinmori, and Hwimori Lak. Along with Bukjangdan, which uses various techniques, Jindo drum nori has excellent dance moves.

    Jindo Book Nori is an exciting game that shows both the intensity of drum sounds and the flexibility and diversity of janggu. It has been played by Kim Haeng-ryeol, the master of drum Nori, and has now been played by Kim Gil-sun, Kim Kwan-woo, and Yang Tae-ok.
  • 1987.8.25
    designated date
    Manga is one of the folk songs that bier people sing while wearing bier. There are two types of Jindo Manga, one of which is to call in the masters of the application to sing the full song when a portrait is made in a house known as a wealthy or local aristocrat. Another is to have the village's bier-snowpiercer do bier.

    The artists of the application are members of the shaman, who play drums, janggu, iron, and flute when the bier goes out, and often sing a full song with various editorials and tunes. When a village bier singer sings a full song, it is a bit simple to sing E-sori or Poverty Bodhisattva only.

    Jindo Manga is a specialized bier sound that is sung in Jisan-myeon, which is composed of Jinyeombul, Esori, Jaehwasori, Hajeok-sori, Dari Cheongeun, and Dagujil. The characteristic of Jindo Manga is that women in the village participate as headmen and sing together. These women are known as peddlers, and what could be seen in the aristocrats' traveling procession is now common. In addition, the two masked benches perform sword dances on ponies to chase away evil spirits, while torches appear and the mourning clothes of the residents are also unique.

    Jindo Manga is a very important cultural asset in terms of folklore, given that the shaman's music and folk songs are used together and the unique characteristics of funeral customs followed by women as headmen.
  • 1987.8.25
    designated date
    Nongyo is a song that is sung to forget fatigue and improve efficiency while working on rice paddies and fields, also known as wild songs or farming sounds. As one of the folk songs, the song may be sung individually or collectively and may vary depending on the region.

    Woo Soo-young's Women's Farm Song is a folk song sung by women while farming. The story consists of a field-matching song, a barley threshing song, a bangataryeong, a dongdungtaryeong, a street nook, and a afterpuri.

    A field hawk is a song that is sung when a field is being dug, a barley threshing is sung when a barley threshing is done, while a bangataryeong is sung when a person is resting while working. Gilkkkungi is a song that is sung on the way home from work, and after work is a song that is sung while playing.

    Woo Soo-young and her daughter's song is a labor song and contains the joys and sorrows of life.
  • 1971.8.26
    designated date
    A haenyeo song refers to a folk song sung by female divers in Jeju Island while rowing when they go out or come in on a boat. This folk song and rowing movement are closely related and serve as a lighter and more enjoyable guide to labor.

    Haenyeo sing rhythmically with tewak, mesh, and broom used to work. According to the content, it expresses the hard work and daily life in a friendly way, showing a strong spirit about living, and has a strong dynamic and straightforward color. When the two take turns shouting, the rest will be given the chorus, such as "Yi-Ya-Ya-Yi-Ya-Ya. Sometimes fishermen make good noises and haenyeo make bad noises. Although the number of joints in the musical instrument that appear in the melody is not constant due to the complicated singing style, the melody from high to low notes with the two words paired is repeated consistently. The beat is a regular 6/8 beat, and the speed is usually connected freely according to the working situation from fast to very fast.

    The haenyeo song is a folk song that forms the broadest consensus among fishing songs, and the entertainment owner Ahn Do-in and the holding group living in Jeju Island are continuing the trend.
  • 1971.8.26
    Designated date
    Inspiration is a high-pitched word for the goblin, the Jeju dialect of the goblin. Yeonggam Nori is a type of play-gut among the shamanic rituals in Jeju Island, which is also a mask play for the goblin god, and is performed to wish for many fish to be caught or to recover from the disease.

    Yeonggam Nori is held at night after holding a memorial service in the yard. On top of the ancestral rites table, there are dishes enjoyed by the god of inspiration, such as pig head, sorghum rice cake, and soju. When one person calls the spirit after announcing the time and reason of the rite to the spirit god and the names of the participants, two shamans dressed as paper goblins, old straw shoes, old gat and gombangdae come in. Yeonggamsin is treated to sacrificial food by making a fuss over humorous conversation and frivolous behavior. At this time, a sick person sits in the yard and walks around the patient's body with a mat. After Pudak Street is over, straw boats carrying offerings are sent to sea.

    This play offers a glimpse of the people's consciousness in that it is a comprehensive art festival full of satire and humor, and is also valuable as a masquerade to find the starting point of the play.