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K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 2000.10.19
    designated date
    Sajikdaeje is a national rite given to the god of land and grain, while Sajik means the god of land, and Jik means the god of grain. In ancient times, when a country was established, a ritual was held to pray for the people to live comfortably in the land and grain gods. The memorial service for the resignation, which has been held since the Three Kingdoms Period, offers a glimpse into our ancestors' gratitude for nature.

    King Taejo of the Joseon Dynasty established Jongmyo Shrine and Sajikdan Altar (Historic Site No. 121) along with the royal palace to set up Jongmyo Shrine on the east side of Gyeongbokgung Palace, Sajikdan Altar on the west, and Sajikdan Altar in each province to pray for the comfort and good harvest of the people. Sajikdan has assigned divisions (Taesasin and Futosin) and direct divisions (Tajiksin and Hujiksin) to the east and west). The ancestral tablets of Taiji and Taijik face north to the south of the Dansang, the huto god to the left of the Taoist god, and the latter to the left of Taijiksin.

    Usually, ancestral rites were held in February and August, and a rain ritual was held in the event of a major national crisis or drought. The procedures and formalities for holding ancestral rites have changed little by little over time, but gradually we moved away from the stage of imitating the Chinese ways and had our own examples. Various kinds of grain including raw meat of cattle, pigs, and sheep are prepared today, and the rituals are held in the order of spirits, emperors, jinchan, choheonrye, aheonrye, Jongheonrye, Eokbokrye, Cheolbyeondu, Songsin, and Mangye (Mangye).

    The music, dance, food, clothing, and rituals used in Sajikje, as well as our own ritual procedures for holding rituals, help us understand traditional culture. In 1894 (the 31st year of King Gojong's reign), the system was changed to the new government system, and was abolished by Japan's coercion in the 2nd year of King Sunjong's reign (1908). Since then, it was restored in October 1988 through the testimony of the late Yi Eun-pyo, who was the holder of the Jongmyo Jeryeondae. Currently, the Sajik Daejebongsa Committee, located within the Jeonju Yi Clan, preserves and inherits the Sajik Daeje.
  • 2001.10.23
    designated date
    Pansori Gobeob was born after the mid-Joseon Dynasty when Pansori was settled, and the drummer (the drummer) accompanies Pansori to the north.

    Since the ancient law was an accompaniment of pansori, it was not often used to promote the master, so it was very rare to see famous master singers during the Joseon Dynasty. In addition, the development of classical music was minimal as it was regarded as a means of Pansori classes. In the late Joseon Dynasty, pansori developed with a wide variety of characteristics, but it was not until the end of the 19th century that professional masters came out to develop the classical music.

    There are many theories in pansori-go method, but it can be largely divided into posture theory, breakdown theory, and acting theory. Posture theory puts the drum in front of the left side of the singer and sits facing the singer. The drum pulls to the left, puts its left thumb on the left side of the drum, and hits the left side of the barrel. Hold the drumstick in your right hand and put it on your lap, and hit it to the sound, but do not go up from left to right and above your head to head. Gojang theory is that a drummer beats the rhythm according to the sound of a singer, and plays the beginning of the syllable and the flow of the melody by hitting the drum and leather using his hands and chae. The theory of acting allows the master to accept the sound (chang) and the aniri (horse) as the oppoSite of the singer, and depending on the sound, the sound of the singer naturally connects with the sound, adding excitement to the sound, filling the gap in the sound of the singer's sound.

    Jeong Hwa-young and Song Won-jo are recognized as the holders of Pansori High School Act entertainment.

    ※For more information on the above cultural assets, please contact the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (☎02-2133-2616).
  • 2001.10.23
    designated date
    Somokjang refers to a carpenter who has the skills and functions of making wooden furniture such as a building door, a window, a wardrobe, a gauge, a desk, and a door-gap, which are symmetrical to a major construction Site.

    The name "small ranch" appeared from the Goryeo Dynasty, and it was called "ranch" during the Joseon Dynasty, but it seems to have been distinguished from the main sections. Until the early Joseon Dynasty, wooden furniture was mainly made for the royal family and the upper class, but during the late Joseon Dynasty, it was widely distributed to the private sector and was highly diversified, resulting in significant regional characteristics.

    For example, in the southern part of the country, wooden ornaments were used as a precious feature of the tree and were not coated with lacquer. Tongyeong is a typical example. The wardrobe in Hwasun, South Jeolla Province, combines both patterns, lacquer and decorations, and features a black tree. As such, the purpose of the wooden furniture is to maximize the wood texture of wood and pursue natural beauty. Therefore, small wooden furniture was made based on the form, standard, technique, and pattern of traditional furniture.

    Function holders Kim Chang-sik and Shim Yong-sik are continuing the trend.

    ※For more information on the above cultural assets, please contact the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (☎02-2133-2616).
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    A bedline refers to a stitch in a needle, which is the whole of the doubles. Clothing is a generic term for clothing and decorations, so the scope includes everything that can be made of sewing by threading a needle. The person who has this technique and its function is called a bedclothes.

    It is said that it was before history that people started sewing. The Silla-era metalwork, similar to the current needle, was excavated, and a significant level of bedding during the Three Kingdoms Period is well illustrated by the murals of Goguryeo and the "Samguk sagi." The Goryeo and Joseon Periods were further developed and passed down to this day.

    The necessary tools for the bedding include cloth, needle, thread, failure, thimble, scissors, ruler, iron, iron, nail needle, etc. As for fabrics, silk, cotton, ramie, and linen are mainly used. In fact, we use a lot of cotton yarn, but silk sewing always uses silk thread. The choice of yarn depends on the material, color, thickness, etc. of the fabric.

    The stitching method is basic persimmon and groove, stitching, topsoil, whipping, and balling, etc., and the necessary stitching method is used depending on the area of the garment. According to seasonal changes, seams are sewn thinly in summer, and cotton is added in spring and fall to make warm clothes. In particular, our clothes have features that highlight the beauty of the detailed plane and curve.

    In the past, all women had to know how to do the needlework, so the needle method continued to be practiced in the house and learned how to do it. There were times when the technique was passed down in the royal court due to bedrooms, but it was generally inherited by the family and is now impossible.

    On December 31, 1996, Park Gwang-hoon was recognized as the holder of the function of the intangible cultural asset burial Site and passed down our unique burial technique. On August 10, 2017, he was recognized as an honorary holder.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb
  • 2017.1.6
    designated date
    The Jinan Plateau, called the roof of Honam, is a treasure house of the Kiln Site. Jinan County, North Jeolla Province, also had the highest concentration of pottery on the Jinan Plateau, where onggi production was brisk due to the large amount of clay and abundant firewood. The geopolitical advantage or dynamism as a cultural contact area is inherent in the Onggi culture of the Jinan Plateau area, which is revealed specifically in the Onggi Point custom and the formation of Onggi.



    Sonnae Onggi, Pyeongjang-ri, Baegun-myeon, Jinan-gun, Jeonbuk, is also in line with the tradition of the Jinan Plateau ceramic culture, and the Historical and sustainability of the local Onggi related to the village's geographical name is still valid to this day, making it a representative Onggi point that has been producing the Jinan Plateau-type Onggi.
  • 2006.1.12
    designated date
    The entrance is a technique used in many places to decorate the metal surface with gold or silver thread, and the entrance is our unique name. The term inlaid, which is commonly used together, refers to the technique of making patterns with different materials regardless of the material, and is called yanggam in China. Sanggam is a term that came from Japan. The traditional patterns used for the entrance are plant doors, animal doors, geometries, and letters, and the combination of them is harmoniously shaped, with a painted pattern in the background and a pictorial pattern in the center. The job Site is an art that requires a high level of precision workmanship and a high eye for objects and patterns.

    On January 12, 2006 been recognition of activity as holder of the choegyojun.

    ※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616)
  • 2006.1.12
    designated date
    The entrance is a technique used in many places to decorate the metal surface with gold or silver thread, and the entrance is our unique name. The term inlaid, which is commonly used together, refers to the technique of making patterns with different materials regardless of the material, and is called yanggam in China. Sanggam is a term that came from Japan. The traditional patterns used for the entrance are plant doors, animal doors, geometries, and letters, and the combination of them is harmoniously shaped, with a painted pattern in the background and a pictorial pattern in the center. The job Site is an art that requires a high level of precision workmanship and a high eye for objects and patterns.

    On January 12, 2006 been recognition of activity as holder of the choegyojun.

    ※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616)
  • 1967.1.16
    designated date
    As textile traditionally made in the country, mosi (fine ramie) is made of the outer skin of ramie plant stalks. A record made during the reign of King Gyeongmun (r. 861-875) of Unified Silla makes us assume that it was sold to neighboring countries. Ramie plant is a perennial plant. The stalks close to the root are harvested when they turn yellowish brown and the leaves at the bottom are withered. They are harvested three times a year, i.e., between May and early June, between early August and late August, and between early October and late October. Those harvested between early August and late August are the best in terms of quality.

    Fine ramie produced in Hansan is far better than that produced in other areas in terms of quality and exquiSiteness. Thus, fine ramie of Hansan has been regarded as synonymous with fine ramie in this country. Fine ramie is produced as follows: first of all, the outer skin is peeled from the harvested stalks; the peeled off skin is soaked in water for about a day and dried; then it is soaked again in water; strands of split ramie pieces are made into threads, and this process of making threads decides the thickness uniformity of threads. Products of Hansan are known for exquiSiteness and thickness uniformity. The thickness of threads decides how many strands are to be put into a given space. The threads are starched, and then ramie is woven with a weaving machine. White ramie fabric is made through the process of bleaching based on the repeated process of soaking ramie fabric and then drying it in the sun.

    Ramie fabric is usually divided into 7 sae through 15 sae. One sae refers to 80 warp threads woven into a 30cm wide cloth. A cloth with 10 sae or more is called semosi (finely woven ramie). Ramie cloth is easily broken in a space with insufficient humidity. Thus, ramie weavers should work in unventilated space even in summer. They cannot work on a windy or a rainy day. Nowadays, however, white ramie fabric is made by means of chlorine bleaching. The relevant industry is on the decline with the development of modern textile technology.

    Fine Ramie Weaving of Hansan has been designated as important intangible cultural heritage to maintain the production skills considering its Historical value as material for traditional summer clothes, symbolizing the country’s esthetic quality.
  • 2012.1.30
    designated date
    ☆Changho(traditional window) accounts for a very high proportion of Korean architecture. In particular, most of the walls of palaces are treated with changho. Therefore, Korean changho is an important factor in determining architectural designs, and they are of many types and sizes, requiring advanced techniques and techniques.
    Therefore, to make traditional Korean windows, skilled craftsmen(changho-jang) with many years of experience are required. Changho-jang is classified as a somok-jang, because somok-jangs are in charge of decorative parts while daemok-jangs are in charge of the structural parts of the building.
    Changho-jang has become an essential part of increasing perfection with its delicacy.

    Lee Jong-han, the holder, has been engaged in changho production since 1963, and is recognized as having related functions by participating in repairing changho's of many Historical Sites' including the Hapcheon Haeinsa Temple, Yecheon Yongmunsa Temple.

    The value of protection is high, such as the fact that there are only a few windows nationwide that produce windows essential to traditional architecture and that the foundation for transmission is relatively difficult due to low profitability.
  • 2010.2.16
    designated date
    ☆Najeonchil-gi is a craft made from conch, abalone, shellfish, etc. on a lacquer surface, and is a representative artifact of Korean people with a well-coordinated lacquer, which boasts a colorful natural color and a subtle gloss. (Najeon=mother-of-pearl, chilgi=lacquerware)

    Gwangju is known as "a three-black town" due to its high production of lacquer, ink and charcoal, and lacquerware and tools have been found in the Historic Site No. 375 of Sinchang-dong, proving the long history of lacquer crafts.

    Kim Ki-bok is a master of the art of making najeon(lacquer making) and aesthetic value. Born in Tongyeong, he has continued to play najeon for more than 50 years since the 16th century. He entered the Najeonchilgi Technical School in Tongyeong and received the skills and moved to Gwangju at the age of 19. In particular, he is good at 'dry' technique, which is a technique for drying lacquer.