K-Cultural Heritage 2 Page > Little Korea

K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 2013.12.19
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    Having been handed down for nine generations for 300 years, 'Miyeok Onggi' stubbornly follows the recipe of traditional onggi, making it by hand, and especially applying natural glaze.

    The most important quality clay, known as natural glaze, is made by mixing pine trees with iron-containing medicinal soil. It is known that it makes fine holes on the surface of the onggi that allow air to pass through, so that it does not spoil or spoil even if it is stored over the years, maintains the taste and freshness of the food for a long time, and even acts as a natural self-regulation that removes pollutants.

    In particular, this region's unique onggi method, which is made by beating and baking in lye, is not only harmless to the human body but also has a living and breathing bio-effect.

    In addition, the company consistently produces small and friendly earthenware unique to the southern part of the country, focusing on continuing the traditional Onggi tradition.
  • 2013.12.19
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    Chochojang is the technique of making traditional living tools, agricultural tools, folk belief tools, etc. with straw and so on.

    It is becoming a technology that is being forgotten due to changes in materials. Master craftsman Lim Chae-ji of Gokseong has learned traditional straw-planting techniques in a circular fashion.
  • 2013.12.19
    designated date
    As a function of making tteok-sal and multi-deck plates, it is a very important traditional carving technique that is related to life or customs, and is necessary for our daily life in terms of culture or art history.

    Kim Gyu-seok is systematically passed down due to his excellent technical skills and academic support by learning wood carving and pattern carving from Lee Ju-cheol, and learning rice cake and multi-plate techniques from Lee Yeon-chae.
  • 2013.12.19
    designated date
    The sound of Gwangyang Jinwol gizzard is a labor song that has been handed down around Gwangyang Bay, and is an intangible folk heritage that shows the diversity of life that Gwangyang Bay people have lived in the ecological environment at the mouth of the Seomjingang River and the southern coast.

    It is said to be in the form of a performance, and it consists of the sound of rowing, netting, net raising, phlegm, late sound, and gizzard shirking, and Nanjanggut. It features the unique fishing and cultural characteristics of Gwangyang Bay, which is associated with the representative species of fish on the southern coast.
  • 1990.12.20
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    Soongseonjeon Hall is a pavilion dedicated to the ancestral tablets of King Sijo of Garakguk and his queen Heo, and is dedicated to supporting local folk paintings. This pavilion is one of the eight exhibitions, along with the Royal Tomb of King Gukjodan and King Dongmyeong of Goguryeo, the Sunginjeon of King Hyukgeose of Silla, the Sungdeokjeon of King Talhae, the Sunghyejeon of King Algi, King Munmu and King Gyeongsun of Baekje, the Sungyeoljeon of King Onjo of Goryeo, and the Sunguijeon of King Sijo of King Sijo of Goryeo.

    The Great Festival of Soongseonjeon is held on March 15 of the lunar calendar for Chunhyang and September 15 of the lunar calendar for the second time, and the time is held for about an hour from 10 p.m. of Sango. It was originally said that it was held for 334 years until the 12th year (532) of the 10th King Guhyeong (Goohae or Guchungwang) when it began to accept the memorial services for five times a year on the 3rd, 7th, 5th, and 15th of January.

    Even after the annexation of Silla, ancestral rites continued. In the 30th year of Silla and the year of the reign of King Munmu (661), the ancestral rites were held at the Jongmyo Jerye, and 30 royal protocols were dedicated to the royal family near King Suro's tomb and managed by the Gaya army.

    In 1792 (the 16th year of King Jeongjo's reign), the entire school of Chunchushihyang, the founder of Garakguk, was established. Since then, the congratulatory message of the Chunchudaeje Festival has been issued under the name of the king of the Joseon Dynasty, and 53 articles of incense and other products, including Uiseong, were prepared by the Gimhae-bu and protected them. In addition, the Lunar New Year, the Lunar New Year, the New Year, Dano, the same year, the same year's Day, Dano, the same year's Day, the same year's Day, the same year's Day, the same year'
  • 1995.12.20
    designated date
    lacquer shall be applied to a wooden bowl, etc. with a colouring agent, drying, etc. in lacquer gin to keep it from rotting and glossing, and a person with the technique of lacquer and its functions shall be referred to as lacquer paste shall be referred to as lacquer paste.

    It is estimated that lacquer, which is handed down in Namwon-si, was the foundation of Shilsangsa Temple in Jirisan Mountain, and its origin was achieved by making woodcrafts such as bowls and jegae for the Buddha. After that, research and technology were developed by Yang Ki-soo, a natural lacquerware master, when Korea's first woodworking school was established during the Japanese Colonial Period.

    Depending on how sap is collected, lacquer is made in various colors, including raw paint and painting, with natural lacquer gin, while painted craftsmanship has a subtle brown color as it ages. In addition, the products completed through the painting of chaebol up to 67 times have a very good effect on desiccation, waterproofing, insect repellent, and polishing.

    Kim Eul-saeng of Namwon and Lee Eui-sik of Jeonju, who have been running three generations of lacquerware, have passed down the wood painting business to continue the tradition of lacquer techniques.
  • 2001.12.20
    designated date
    Darye is a rite of courtesy to give tea to a person or a Buddhist monk, and although it is a royal tea ceremony, it is a tea ceremony for oil prices, impossibility, and family members.

    It is not known exactly when tea, also written as Myeong or Cheon, began to be consumed as a drink.In The History of the Three Kingdoms, the tea was from Queen Seondeok.A record of ' indicates that he drank tea at least in the 7th century.

    In addition, in 828 (the third year of King Heungdeok's reign), " Chinese tea tree seeds were brought in and planted on Mount Jiri to meet the growing demand.There's a record of ."In <The History of the Three Kingdoms>, a tea ceremony was held at the Jongmyo Shrine of Gaya during the reign of King Munmu of Silla in 661, along with rice cakes and fruits.The record of " shows that he drank as a symbol.

    The royal tea ceremony of the Goryeo Dynasty was held during the royal ceremony of Taehu, Taeja's Book Peak, Wonja's Birth, and Taeja's Birthday. The record of tea served by the princess when she was married is shown in "Goryosa".

    The royal tea ceremonies and royal tea ceremonies of the Joseon Dynasty can be divided into the tea ceremonies for envoys and royal families. Hwagang was a lecture on scripture and fraud by gathering the management and empty guests of the teacher and Si Gangwon, and the records of his tea ceremony are shown in the Annals of King Sejong. The ceremony was held in Taepyeonggwan, Sajeongjeon, Injeongjeon, and Myeongnyundang until King Gojong's reign, in which the king or prince served tea to Chinese envoys.

    A brief introduction to the procedures of Kim Eui-jeong's private reception is as follows.

    The king's chair shall be installed on the west wall, the envoy's chair shall be installed facing west on the east wall, and the north side shall be installed on the north wall.The king and the envoy take their seats after the town.One person to remove the sandal is to stand on the west side, while another person is to stand on the west side with a tray of tea and tea.The two saon remove a tray of fruit, one facing south to the right of the Jeongsa Temple, and one facing north to the left of the adverb.

    The manufacturer stands facing north on the right side of the king with a tray of fruit, and when the king takes a cup of tea and removes it, he follows the tea and sits down and raises it to the king, the king rises up from the chair, stands up a little, and stands up a little, and the Sashindo stands up a little, and stands a little forward. The king takes a cup of tea and goes to Jeongsa Temple and hands the tea. A political affairs officer receives a bell and gives it to a Tong temporarily. The manufacturer takes the tea with a teacup again and hands it to the vice president.When an adverb receives a teacup, he retreats a little bit, and the manufacturer picks up the tea with the cup and puts it on the official, and Jeong-sa holds the teacup and goes out to the king and raises the tea. At this time, the manufacturing industry moves westward and kneels north.

    When the king holds the teacup, the Tong puts the teacup on the Zheng and the King sits on the chair and drinks tea. He goes before the king of the making and knelt down, receives a cup of tea, and leaves it on a tea tray. For the removal of the Monk stands and puts fruit on the envoy, and the Emperor kneels down and puts the king's fruit on the table. When I'm done, I'll take the tray out.

    The tools used in royal tea ceremonies include 湯罐 (a kettle for boiling tea), 茶罐 (a kettle for brewing tea), 茶罐 (a bowl for cooling water), tea cups, cup stands, , (a bowl for cooling water), teaspoons, tea pots, tea towels, tea bottles, and water pumps.

    On December 20, 2001 been recognition of activity as holder of the gimuijeong.

    ※For more information on the above cultural assets, please contact the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (☎02-2133-2616).
  • 1967.12.21
    designated date
    Yaryu is a custom of Ogwangdae (mask dance drama) that was first performed in the inland areas of Gyeongsangnam-do but spread to Suyeong, Dongnae, and Busanjin. Yaryu literally means playing in an open field. This mask play was performed by non-professionals like villagers. Dongnae Yaryu was performed on the evening of the full moon of January 15 on the lunar calendar, supposedly to pray for a good year for crops. Dongnae Yaryu was said to have been started about 100 years ago after its cousin performed in nearby Suyeong. Now performed as an entertainment, it is composed of four acts: leper dance, gag exchanged between a yangban (nobleman) and Malttugi (servant), Yeongno (therianthropic character)’s dance, and old couple’s dance. Members of the troupe march to the site of performance while playing music. The main subject of the performance is a satire about nobles. The masks are made of gourds. The chin part of the masks is made movable, moving upward and downward while its wearer delivers a gag. The play is performed to the accompaniment of percussion instruments, which play exorcist music. Malttugi’s dance and nobleman’s dance are the leading performances. Obangsin (Deities of the Five Directions)’s dance, satire about deprave monks, and lion dance -- which are usually included in Ogwangdae mask dance drama -- are not performed in Dongnae Yaryu.
  • 1968.12.21
    designated date
    Jeongak (literally “elegant orthodox music”) refers to music played at the Royal Palace, government offices, and local places where people of refined tastes gathered together. As one of the three bamboo instruments developed during the Silla Period (57 BC - 935 AD), i.e., daegeum (large-sized bamboo flute), junggeum (medium-sized bamboo flute), and sogeum (small-sized bamboo flute), Daegeum is the longest among the traditional transverse flutes of the country. It has the emboucher hole at the right end, a buzzing membrane made of inner skin of reed that gives it a special timber, and six holes. Since it makes a wider range of sound than other instruments, it is used as a leading solo instrument. Daegeum-played jeongak covers all kinds of formal ceremonial music, which are all ensembles. It is not known when they started to be played solo. The titles of the pieces of music played by daegeum include Cheongseong Jajinhanip, Pyeongjo Hoesang, and Jajinhanip. Melodies made by Daegeum Jeongak sound delicate but not light, soft but not feeble, and fragile but not shallow.
  • 1968.12.21
    designated date
    As a drum dance handed down in Tongyeong (Chungmu), Gyeongsangnam-do, it was performed by barmaids and boys. During the Japanese Invasion of Korea (1592-1598), Admiral Yi Sun-sin had this dance played to boost the morale of his troops or celebrate the victory of battles. Many dances performed in Tongyeong, a naval town, were called Seungjeonmu (Victory Dance). Only the Mugo (Drum Dance) was designated as important intangible cultural heritage under the name Seungjeonmu in 1968. Nine years later, Geommu (Sword Dance) was included in said designation. Looking at how a victory dance is performed, four dancing women in ceremonial dress with long white cuffs make movements, gathering in the direction of the drum placed at the center and then scattering in four directions with soft steps after beating the drum; thus creating a grand, joyous atmosphere. Samhyeon dodeuri (dodeuri rhythm music by three strings) and taryeong (Korean folk song) were used as accompaniment in music. The overall dance movements are simple and antiquated, carrying unique local characteristics. Dancers performing a sword dance wear white jacket, red skirt, black sleeveless coat, military official’s hat, red belt, and jacket with long, multicolor-striped undershirts while holding a sword in each hand. The tools used and dancers’ movements in Seungjeonmu are similar to the Mugo performed at the Royal Palace. The elegant dance movements, melodies of music, and overall exquisite arrangement make it a dance with high artistic and traditional value.
  • 1968.12.21
    designated date
    There are several types of strings used to make decorative knots. Circular strings used in accessories or pouches are called dongdahoe. Wide and flat strings used in waist belts are called gwangdahoe, whereas knots used in attire or ceremonial accessories are called gyeokdap or gyeolja. Knots date back to the primeval period, but the techniques for making knots or dyeing them as handed down in this country were introduced from China during the Three Kingdoms Period. During the Joseon Period, the government designated knot craftsmen. As for the materials used to make knots, there are threads made of silk, ramie, mulberry, hemp, and woolen yarn. Knot shapes vary depending on the color, thickness, and methods used for tying. The names used to call them differ from region to region. The names were based on household items, flowers, or insects, such as ginger piece, butterfly, dragonfly, chrysanthemum, etc. Tassels were attached to the lower end of the decorative knots used for musical instruments, vehicles, or Buddhist ceremonies. There were diverse types and levels of tassels depending on their use, i.e., whether they were for the Royal Palace or ordinary households.
  • 1968.12.21
    designated date
    Sanjo refers to the playing of an instrument solo to the accompaniment of janggo (hourglass-shaped drum), moving from slow to fast rhythm, in four to six movements. Gayageum Sanjo is Korean instrumental folk music played solo with gayageum (twelve-stringed zither). Gayageum Byeongchang refers to the singing and playing of gayageum at the same time. All Sanjo start with slow rhythm and gradually changes to faster rhythm, making listeners feel tense and increasingly delighted. Gayamgeum Sanjo is made up of four to six rhythms: jinyangjo (slow), jungmori (moderate), jungjungmori (moderately fast), jajinmori (fast), and hwimori (fastest). Compared to other instrument-based Sanjo, Gayageum Sanjo masters could form diverse schools thanks to the unique characteristics of gayageum. A singer engaging in Gayageum Byeongchang sings a part of danga or pansori to the accompaniment of his/her own gayageum playing. Gayageum Byeongchang used to be sung by Gayageum Sanjo masters, but the current tendency is for the separation between players of Sanjo and Byeongchang. A song sung as Byeongchang creates its own atmosphere due to the unique melody of gayageum. The following are well-known parts of Gayageum Byeongchang: Jebinojeonggi (Route of the Swallow's Trip) of Pansori Heungboga (Song of Heungbo), Sarangga (Song of Love) of Chunhyangga (Song of Chunhyang), Gogocheonbyeon (Brightness of the Sunshine in the Sky) of Sugungga (Song of the Rabbit and the Turtle), and “Sim Cheong’s Father on His Way to Hwangseong” of Simcheongga (Song of Sim Cheong).
  • 1988.12.21
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    The wild song is a folk song sung during farming, and the wild song of Jangsan-do is a song sung by women in Jangsan-myeon, Sinan-gun.

    Jangsan-do's wild song is a song that is exciting and exciting, even though it is a tough life for women and a song with deep sorrowful. Also, as it is an island, it is not mixed with other local folk songs, so it is native and has a feminine melody. The plot consists of a mochi-gi song sung by steaming rice paddies, a rice planting song sung by planting rice paddies, and a rice paddies song sung by rice paddies on their way back. It is not boring because it changes from late tunes to fast tunes such as Jungmori, Jungjungmori, and Jajinmori, and it is completely different from Jindo's wild songs and Namdo's labor songs on land.

    Jangsando Deulsong is a folk song that contains the lives of the Korean people, and it is designated as an intangible cultural asset because it has unique rhythms and contents.
  • 1988.12.21
    designated date
    A folk song is a song that comes naturally among the people and is passed down from mouth to mouth. It is closely related to life by functions such as occupation, wind speed, play, etc., and may vary depending on the preference of the region or callers, or spontaneously.

    The fishing songs in Korea are divided into work songs sung while working in the sea and boat songs sung while rowing, and the anchovy song in Gageodo is a combination of these two types of folk songs. The contents include the sound of brass, the sound of netting, the sound of liquor rain, the sound of net raising, the sound of quick rowing, and the sound of windmills. The brass sound is a song sung when rowing on the way to catch anchovies, and the sound of an anchovy hat is a song that drives anchovies with a torch lit when anchovies are found. The sound of Sulbi is a song that is sung when the anchovies are scooped up with phlegm. The fast rowing sound is a song sung when the boat is full of anchovies as it raises its net and returns home.

    This song is a combination of a boat song and a song sung when catching anchovies, forming a folk song, and has a singing style that is not found in other local folk songs. The melody is also called Sinawijo, so it has a deep correlation with Muak and will be valuable material to reveal the true nature of the folk songs of the South.
  • 2017.12.21
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    The charcoal work of Gwangnyeosan Mountain is a collection of the charcoal work of Aehwan, which was sung during the process of producing charcoal. Therefore, the sequence of development of the song shows the process of producing charcoal.

    The period of producing charcoal is quite long. Therefore, the sound of charcoal work is mixed with songs of each genre. A ritual song was sung when performing a ritual, a play song when resting, and a labor song when working. Therefore, the song was sung individually when the participants worked together and individually when they were working together, and the most prominent characteristic of charcoal Ilsori is that the various styles of singing and various genres coexist together.