K-Cultural Heritage 4 Page > Little Korea

K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 2012.8.3
    designated date
    He participated in the Hapjukseon project with his father Um Ju-won from his boyhood, and was trained in the Hapjukseon production process from 1991.

    In 1997, miseongong, run by acquiring ordinary fellow Colonial paradoxical the debt and varnished with lacquer on the shaft of an arrow that have remained only by studying the relics and records of techniques and hapjjuk.Daeryun chilseon, 50 years old baekjjeop chilseon, to reproduce.

    2008 Statue of the 7th Korean lacquer crafts competition
    2009 entry into the 34th Victory Crafts Competition
  • 2013.8.5
    designated date
    The shipbuilding yard is a craftsman who makes traditional wooden vessels, and Jeollanam-do has been designated as an intangible cultural asset because the traditional boat making technology is disappearing as the power lines became common, while fishing was developed early and fishing techniques were excellent on both sides of the southwestern coast.
    (Owner Cho Il-ok, Shipyard)
  • 2013.8.5
    designated date
    It is a labor song sung jointly by women in the mountainous inland area of Jeollanam-do while farming fields.

    It was designated as Local Cultural Heritage No. 18 in Hwasun-gun on December 2, 2003, and was promoted to Jeollanam-do Intangible Cultural Property No. 51 on August 5, 2013.
  • 2013.8.5
    designated date
    To be held by shamans in order to appease the dead in the Sinan Jangsan-do, Bigeum and Docho areas.

    Washing Kimgut is a representative shamanistic rite in Honam, which cleans the spirit of the deceased and comforts their families.

    There are many differences from Jindo Washing Gut, which is important academically.
  • 2013.8.5
    designated date
    Jangsando Washing Gut is a religious ritual organized by a shaman for those who died in Jangsando Island and Bigeum and Docho areas in Sinan.

    Unlike nearby Jindo Sushi Kimgut, Ogu Gut is also important academically as it has a different editorial.

    As one of the shamanistic rites representing the Honam region, the rite serves to wash the spirit of the deceased and to soothe the families who face death.
  • 2013.8.5
    designated date
    The wild song in Galgok-ri, Yeongam, is a wild song that represents the song of rice paddy farming in the lower reaches of the Yeongsangang River, which is inherited in Galgok-ri, Sinbuk-myeon, Yeongam-gun, and is preserved in its original form.

    The Galgok-ri wild song contains the entire process of rice farming and the wisdom of our ancestors who worked to relieve their fatigue by singing.

    The composition of the song is 1 Mochi sound, 2 Mochi sound, 3 Nonmaegi sound - Chobeolmaegi (earning sound in the morning, afternoon sound) 4 dubeolmaegi (earning sound in the morning, afternoon sound), mandri (Uyasori), and Jangwon Pungjangmjangsori (Arong dalong).

    The "Gorgok-ri wild song" has a unique feature: morning and afternoon excursion. It is unique to the traditional style of farming. In traditional farming songs, the sounds of the two birds are the same, but in Galgok-ri, it was more efficient to sing different sounds in the morning and afternoon than to sing the same sound all day long. In particular, the folk music ‘eonmori’ used in piping, Cholla provinces <span class onmouseover = ' ' 2 = ' xml up 2 () ' () 2) ' onmouseout = ' dn> with the same configuration Muga. in (舞歌) </ span>The (new) tune and in line when the East Sea coast, Muga, Prodo Enea Grand Reserva, it seems that relatively a long history.<span class = ' ' 2 xml onmouseover (399) / 2 = ' up onmouseout = ' ' () 2 dn> an old law to conform, and of the (古制) </ span>. In 2004, he received the Presidential Prize at the 45th Korean Folk Arts Festival and was recognized as a valuable cultural heritage.
  • 2013.8.5
    designated date
    Woobong Dulsori is a highly artistic folk game performance that won the best prize for starring as a representative of Hwasun-gun at the Namdo Cultural Festival organized by Jeollanam-do in 2008.

    Ubong Deul-sori is a labor song characterized by its lyrical and static nature, unlike the sound of Neungju-myeon or Dogok-myeon, which surrounds the wide plain of the Jiseokgang River basin.

    While most of the sounds are personal, such as songs containing resentment and remorse about the lives of women oppressed by the times, Ubongsori is known to have excellent workmanship due to its macroscopic satire of the times.
  • 1983.8.6
    Designated date
    Nongcheong nori is a Baekjung (July 15th) game that was introduced in Masan and Changwon, and can be found in Dulege, an organization for village collaboration. It is said that it originated from the belief that the upper part of the upper part of the upper part of the upper part of the upper part of the upper part of the rock would be greatly appreciated if the upper part of the upper part of the rock was celebrated.

    Nongcheong nori can be divided into gije, plough jeon, prayer, entertainment and incense. Before leaving for Sangtubawi Rock, a memorial service is held, and a flag as long as 8m long is erected and a high-quality ritual is held as a simple sacrifice, and then the ritual is carried out to Sangtubawi Rock. They march around the flags escorted by the generals, and when they meet another farmhouse, they engage in a war of nerves. Both sides are whirling back and forth, and when the Sagak-dong rings, they run toward the opponent's flag, and if the attack squad climbs up the flagpole and walks or raises the flagpole, the game is over. The winning team should put a flagpole at the top of the standing rock, and the losing team at the bottom. After offering sacrifices in front of the rock and praying on their stomachs, the participants share their drinks and perform pangut with each other.

    Masan Nongcheong Nori is a game that reflects the religious ceremony of wishing good luck with a fierce fighting of spirit, and is characterized by giving recognition regardless of victory or defeat. Although this ritual was lost due to the construction of a water supply station at the top of Eobokgol, it is now meaningful to promote the unity and cooperative spirit of farmers.
  • 1983.8.6
    designated date
    Gamnae Gejuldanggi was a game played by villagers around the fifteenth day of the first lunar month in Miryang Gamnae, and it can be called a modified game of general village-level tug-of-war. As for the origin of the story, it is said that the village elders made a crab-shaped rope and pulled the winning team to settle the dispute as there were many crabs in Gamcheon area from the old days.

    Before the tug-of-war play, we pray for the well-being of the village and the victory in the competition with Dangsan Gut. While the rope is side-lined, the farmers sing Milyang Arirang and dance deotbogeegi dance to boost their excitement, and the farmers will have a preliminary match to pull the row and the jackpot and push the crab catcher away. This game is played in a circle with a diameter of about 2 meters, which looks like a crab's back. A total of 25 people, five from each side, will lie on their shoulders, five from each side, turn their backs against the other, and pull the rope. The winning team will take over as a good crab catcher that year, and at the end, the two teams will unite to hold a pangut.

    The Gamnae Crab Puller is an original folk game designed to resolve conflicts between the residents' harmony and nearby villages, and it is characterized by a small number of people holding the rope around their necks and pulling it down on their stomachs.
  • 2015.8.6
    designated date
    It is a rite held in Goheung-gun, Jeollanam-do, which is well inherited the tradition of Namdo-specific shamanism. On August 6, 2015, it was designated as Jeollanam-do Intangible Cultural Property No.58.

    Born in a hereditary martial arts family, Kim Myeong-rye met her husband and passed on as a family business, and has systematic knowledge and entertainment of Goheung Honmajigut.
  • 1995.8.7
    Designated date
    Dodanggut in Galmae-dong, Guri-si, is located in Guri-si, and the owner is designated as a musician, and Cho Soon-ja is designated as a no-nyeo, and Heo Jae-hoon is an assistant instructor. Although this rite uses the typical name of Dodanggut, it is mainly characterized by the shape of Danggut, a village in northern Gyeonggi Province. It is different from Danggut performed by Hwarangi in southern Gyeonggi Province.

    Galmae-dong is also known as 'Galmaeul', and the rite handed down to this village is called Galmae-dong Dodanggut. Unlike Dodanggut in the southern part of Gyeonggi-do, it is led by Gangsinmu and the villagers in northern Gyeonggi-do.

    It is differentiated in that it is Dodanggut. Since Jeil of Dodanggut in Galmae-dong is from March 2 to March 3 in the lunar calendar, it is related to the Spring and Autumn Period in the third lunar month.

    Because Gullmae-dong Dodanggut is a village rite, it is a characteristic that all villagers attend. Such characteristics are expressed specifically by two things. The ritual of the village is to perform a rite of exorcism with the father of Dodang and the grandmother of Dodang enshrined in Seodang of Seodang. The other is the ritual of the oil price of the god of Seodang to travel around the village by a large-scale fishing event that takes the god of Dodang to Sangsuri tree or oak tree.

    Gullmae-dong Dodanggut has two meanings. One is that the village's joint festival is expressed in the form of a ritual. The whole village is joined by the sacred god of the village, and the solidarity is strengthened through secular play. In addition, in the third lunar month, when farming begins in earnest, it is important to hold a festival to pray for a good harvest and pray for the guardian deity of the village.
  • 1990.8.7
    Designated date
    Jangdo is a small knife on the body that was used as a protection device or accessory regardless of gender, and a person with the skill of making Jangdo is called Jangdojang.

    Since the Goryeo Dynasty, adult men and women have carried it for self-defense, especially since the Japanese Invasion of Korea (1592), women and women of the aristocrats have carried it to protect their purity. Since the late Joseon Dynasty, symbolism and decorativeness have been emphasized more than the actual function of a handknife, making it part of women's nori opening ceremony, and various elaborate and colorful ornaments have been made.

    Among the intestines, the one you wear on your body is called a paddle, and the one you carry in your pocket is called a nando. Depending on the type of knife and sheath, there are silver, white jade, porridge, ink, odong, godmother, ivory, etc. and cylindrical, square, hexagonal, octagonal, etc.

    Jangdo, which served as a guardian and decoration, has been famous for its funeral halls in Yeongju since the mid-Joseon Dynasty. Kim Il-gab is the only victor in the Yeongju region who has been handed down the traditional Jangdo production function, and in North Gyeongsang Province, Kim Il-gab is recognized as an intangible cultural asset to preserve Jangdo craft technology.
  • 1990.8.7
    Designated date
    Cotton, which is made of cotton, was imported from Yuan Dynasty of China in the late Goryeo Dynasty and was mostly made up of cotton clothing from the late Goryeo Dynasty to the late Joseon Dynasty. Since the early Joseon Dynasty, it has been rapidly spreading to the extent that it serves as a currency along with rice, and was one of the major trade items sent to Japan. Moomyung is a traditional Korean fabric that is divided into Gwangmok, Oksangmok, and Western wood. In addition to the materials for clothing, it was used most often as materials for making bedclothes and other household items.

    The production process is divided into wood-burning pear and harvesting, seeding and cotton-riding, cocooning, threading, cotton-flying, and cotton-making. Seedware and cotton farming are the process of removing seeds from cotton and smoothing cotton using an instrument called cottonwool. It is the process of rubbing cotton on a horseboard, and thread is pulled out using a spinning wheel, and thread is wound around the rhythm. The thickness of the thread determines how many rolls will fit in a width. After the loom and grass-eating process of tightening the cotton yarn after the cotton flying, use the loom to squeeze the cotton.

    Moomyungjjjagi was designated as an intangible cultural asset to enrich the clothing of the Korean people and to protect and inherit the traditional techniques that contain the joys and sorrows of the Korean people. Baek Moon-ki, a functional holder living in Seongju-gun, North Gyeongsang Province, is continuing his career.
  • 1998.8.10
    designated date
    Sieve is a must-have tool for families that are used in various ways, such as selecting various cooking powder and grain products from soy sauce making, washing grain, and drying.

    The materials for making the frame are used by pine trees, straw trees, pine roots, and bamboo, while horse tail hairs and ox tail hairs are used as materials for chameu, which are made from natural materials, are difficult to keep for a long time. It can be filled with cloth, nylon cloth, wire, etc. Depending on the hole in the sieve, it is divided into a shoulder, dorsal, medium, powder, and gounce. The shoulder is filled with wire or finely chopped bamboo with the widest sieve. It is common for dorsal fins to be woven with wire in a narrower sieve than the shoulder. The middle distance is also called the middle body, and is filled with cloth. The powder is filled with a small sieve with horse tail feathers, but recently with nylon cloth. The gouge is a thin, tiny hole and is filled with horse tail hairs.

    Chemeugi is a traditional craftsmanship that contains the wisdom of our ancestors. On August 10, 1998, Choi Seong-cheol was recognized as the holder of the intangible cultural property and passed down our unique sieve making techniques. As of August 24, 2012, there was no holder.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb