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K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 1987.8.25
    Designated date
    The roots of our culture began with shamanism and pungmulnori. The drumming originated from Pungmulnori, which is the oldest play, and the sound and dance are in exquisite harmony.

    Buknori has its own characteristics depending on the region. In Jeolla-do, it is divided into Oebukchigi and Yangbukchigi. Oebukchigi is a common form of Jeolla-do, and Yangbukchigi is handed down only to Jindo.

    Unlike ordinary out-of-the-way games, Jindo drum nori starts with a slow gutgeori, jajinmori, and Hwimori Lak. Along with Bukjangdan, which uses various techniques, Jindo drum nori has excellent dance moves.

    Jindo Book Nori is an exciting game that shows both the intensity of drum sounds and the flexibility and diversity of janggu. It has been played by Kim Haeng-ryeol, the master of drum Nori, and has now been played by Kim Gil-sun, Kim Kwan-woo, and Yang Tae-ok.
  • 1987.8.25
    designated date
    Manga is one of the folk songs that bier people sing while wearing bier. There are two types of Jindo Manga, one of which is to call in the masters of the application to sing the full song when a portrait is made in a house known as a wealthy or local aristocrat. Another is to have the village's bier-snowpiercer do bier.

    The artists of the application are members of the shaman, who play drums, janggu, iron, and flute when the bier goes out, and often sing a full song with various editorials and tunes. When a village bier singer sings a full song, it is a bit simple to sing E-sori or Poverty Bodhisattva only.

    Jindo Manga is a specialized bier sound that is sung in Jisan-myeon, which is composed of Jinyeombul, Esori, Jaehwasori, Hajeok-sori, Dari Cheongeun, and Dagujil. The characteristic of Jindo Manga is that women in the village participate as headmen and sing together. These women are known as peddlers, and what could be seen in the aristocrats' traveling procession is now common. In addition, the two masked benches perform sword dances on ponies to chase away evil spirits, while torches appear and the mourning clothes of the residents are also unique.

    Jindo Manga is a very important cultural asset in terms of folklore, given that the shaman's music and folk songs are used together and the unique characteristics of funeral customs followed by women as headmen.
  • 1987.8.25
    designated date
    Nongyo is a song that is sung to forget fatigue and improve efficiency while working on rice paddies and fields, also known as wild songs or farming sounds. As one of the folk songs, the song may be sung individually or collectively and may vary depending on the region.

    Woo Soo-young's Women's Farm Song is a folk song sung by women while farming. The story consists of a field-matching song, a barley threshing song, a bangataryeong, a dongdungtaryeong, a street nook, and a afterpuri.

    A field hawk is a song that is sung when a field is being dug, a barley threshing is sung when a barley threshing is done, while a bangataryeong is sung when a person is resting while working. Gilkkkungi is a song that is sung on the way home from work, and after work is a song that is sung while playing.

    Woo Soo-young and her daughter's song is a labor song and contains the joys and sorrows of life.
  • 1971.8.26
    designated date
    A haenyeo song refers to a folk song sung by female divers in Jeju Island while rowing when they go out or come in on a boat. This folk song and rowing movement are closely related and serve as a lighter and more enjoyable guide to labor.

    Haenyeo sing rhythmically with tewak, mesh, and broom used to work. According to the content, it expresses the hard work and daily life in a friendly way, showing a strong spirit about living, and has a strong dynamic and straightforward color. When the two take turns shouting, the rest will be given the chorus, such as "Yi-Ya-Ya-Yi-Ya-Ya. Sometimes fishermen make good noises and haenyeo make bad noises. Although the number of joints in the musical instrument that appear in the melody is not constant due to the complicated singing style, the melody from high to low notes with the two words paired is repeated consistently. The beat is a regular 6/8 beat, and the speed is usually connected freely according to the working situation from fast to very fast.

    The haenyeo song is a folk song that forms the broadest consensus among fishing songs, and the entertainment owner Ahn Do-in and the holding group living in Jeju Island are continuing the trend.
  • 1971.8.26
    Designated date
    Inspiration is a high-pitched word for the goblin, the Jeju dialect of the goblin. Yeonggam Nori is a type of play-gut among the shamanic rituals in Jeju Island, which is also a mask play for the goblin god, and is performed to wish for many fish to be caught or to recover from the disease.

    Yeonggam Nori is held at night after holding a memorial service in the yard. On top of the ancestral rites table, there are dishes enjoyed by the god of inspiration, such as pig head, sorghum rice cake, and soju. When one person calls the spirit after announcing the time and reason of the rite to the spirit god and the names of the participants, two shamans dressed as paper goblins, old straw shoes, old gat and gombangdae come in. Yeonggamsin is treated to sacrificial food by making a fuss over humorous conversation and frivolous behavior. At this time, a sick person sits in the yard and walks around the patient's body with a mat. After Pudak Street is over, straw boats carrying offerings are sent to sea.

    This play offers a glimpse of the people's consciousness in that it is a comprehensive art festival full of satire and humor, and is also valuable as a masquerade to find the starting point of the play.
  • 1974.8.31
    Designated date
    The ramie fabric, which has been used for a long time, is known as jerky and jerky, and the peeling of ramie grass stems is made from the material. Based on the records sent to the Tang Dynasty of China during the reign of King Gyeongmun of the Unified Silla Dynasty (r. 861-875), it was also used as a trade item with foreign countries.

    Hansan Semosi is a ramie made by Hansan, which has long been called the epitome of ramie, due to its excellent quality, delicacy and elegance. The production process is divided into nine courses: growing and harvesting, making fete, making ramie cakes, making ramie cakes, making ramie goods, ramie flying, ramie weaving, and ramie bleaching. First of all, grow it and harvest it. Tamoxi is a process of peeling and making an infinitesimal fiber, which is a process of splitting the Tamoshi. Mosi Samgi and Mosi Gut Making are the process of making thread by connecting broken Infi fiber, and ramie flying is determined by the thickness of the thread. After going through the grass-eating process of ramie magpie, use a loom to squeeze the ramie. Finally, ramie bleaching is the process of wetting it and drying it several times in the sun to turn it into a white jersey.

    If the humidity was insufficient, it would be easy to break, so they had to squeeze it out of a hut that was not ventilated in the heat and could not work on windy or rainy days. Moreover, with the development of the textile industry, demand has decreased, and the local ramie weaving technology is gradually declining.

    Hansan Semosi is a traditional summer cloth of high historical value that symbolizes the beauty of Korea. It was designated as an intangible cultural asset to protect and transfer its production technology. Na Sang-deok, a functional holder who lives in Seocheon-gun, Chungcheongnam-do, continues his career.
  • 1985.9.1
    designated date
    Gurye Hyangje Julpungnyu refers to a piece of instrumental music depicting the scene of Shakyamuni preaching the Lotus Sutra handed down in Gurye, Jeollanam-do at Vulture Peak, Gijjhakuta Hill. There are two versions of this music, one centered around daepungnyu (wind instruments) and the other around julpungnyu (string instruments). The way julpungnyu is played differs a little between those handed down in Seoul and those handed down in the provinces. The latter are named Hyangje Julpungnyu (julpungnyu of provinces). Originally, this was a piece of vocal music, but it changed to an instrumental and developed into a voluminous suite by adding other instrumental music pieces. It became a leading concerto in the country toward the late Joseon Period (1392 – 1910). It is presumed that it was divided into daepungnyu and julpungnyu in the mid-Joseon Period. Julpungnyu developed as a quiet piece chiefly played indoors. The separation between julpungnyu played in Seoul and those played in the provinces appears to have been made toward the late Joseon Period. Instruments used for julpungnyu are geomungo (six-stringed zither), gayageum (twelve-stringed zither), yanggeum (dulcimer), sepiri (bamboo reed flute), daegeum (bamboo flute), danso (vertical notched flute), and janggo (hourglass-shaped drums). As a quiet piece of music played indoors, julpungnyu is centered around string instruments such as geomungo, gayageum, and yanggeum, with wind instruments making as small a sound as possible. The piece takes about 70 minutes to perform.
  • 1985.9.1
    designated date
    Iri Hyangje Julpungnyu is a piece of instrumental music handed down in Iksan, Jeollabuk-do, depicting the scene of Shakyamuni preaching of the Lotus Sutra, at Vulture Peak, Gijjhakuta Hill. It has a cousin centered around daepungnyu (wind instruments), which differs from julpungnyu in terms of tone and instrumental composition. Iri Hyangje Julpungnyu, which originated in Iksan in 1958, is played on eight instruments (geomungo (six-stringed zither), gayageum (twelve-stringed zither), yanggeum (dulcimer), piri (flute), daegeum (bamboo flute), haegeum (two-stringed fiddle), danso (vertical notched flute), and janggo (hourglass-shaped drums). It is composed of 15 separate pieces of music.
  • 2016.9.1
    designated date
    Farming song that captures the long-standing farming culture and the work of farming in Haman-gun.



    "Haman Nongyo" is a composition of the long-standing farming culture of Haman-gun and the spring, summer, fall, and winter farming as a framework, reviewing the parts that were temporarily and piecemeal as part of the local event program from the 1980s to 1990s.

    The exhibition is held every year by compiling books related to "Haman's Old Folk Song" and Ilsori in Haman.



    Haman Nongyo is a very detailed portrayal of the process of farming during the four seasons, and unlike traditional farming songs, its fast-paced work is outstanding in its lively production is full of excitement.
  • 2019.9.2
    designated date
    National Intangible Cultural Property No. 11-7 "Gimcheon Geumneung Binnae Nongak" is a nongak inherited from Binnae Village in Gwangcheon-ri, Gaeryeong-myeon, Gimcheon-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, and has the characteristics and characteristics of nongak in inland Gyeongsangbuk-do. In particular, Gimcheon Geumneung Binnae Nongak is characterized by a grand drum play with both hands, and the military service that is displayed in Pangu (Yeongpoonggut, Yeongsan Daryeongi).
  • 2019.9.2
    designated date
    "Namwon Nongak" is a nongak handed down in Ongjeong-ri, Geumji-myeon, Namwon-si, North Jeolla Province, and has the characteristics and characteristics of Honam left-hand Nongak. Namwon Nongak reflects the characteristics of geollipgut along with the village rite consisting of Deuldangsangut, Madangbapi, and Pangut. In particular, the back-gut (stolen jab, talent) composition of pangut is unique, and the winners are still making their own boulevards, which are only used in left-hand farming music in Honam.
  • 2001.9.6
    designated date
    Yeomsaekjang refers to a craftsman who dyes cloth with natural pigments. Specifically, the art of dyeing, which has been designated as Important Intangible Cultural Heritage, involves dyeing with indigo. In the Joseon Dynasty, dyeing was a highly specialized skill such that a dyeing specialist was attached to the royal court. Natural dyes used for coloring cloth are plant, mineral, or animal matter, used as is or slightly processed. There are all kinds of dyes, but the indigo bush (Persicaria tinctoria) was the most difficult to use; the complicated dyeing process also required a high level of skill. With modernization as well as the introduction of chemical dyes, traditional dyeing has all but vanished. Thanks to a handful of dedicated craftsmen who have worked to revive the art since the 1970s, however, the art has been kept alive.
  • 1992.9.8
    designated date
    Pansori refers to a singer weaving a long story by mixing a spear (sound), anil (word), and body gesture (screw) to the rhythm of the drummer. After the mid-Joseon period, the song was developed based on the unique tunes of the southern part of the country. Depending on the region, it was divided into Dongpyeonje (Northeast of Jeolla-do), Seopyeonje (Northern Jeolla-do), and Jungdongje (Gyeonggi-do and Chungcheong-do).

    Currently, only "Chunhyangga, Simcheongga, Sugungga, Heungbooga, and Jeokbyeokga" are handed down as five madang of pansori or five bahtang of pansori, and are designated as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

    Although Pansori in Daegu does not have a specific name for its creation, many master singers have been active in the Daegu area since ancient times and have unique characteristics. Lee Myung-hee, designated as the holder of pansori entertainment, continues the tradition of Dongchoje Pansori Heungboga, which was taught by Kim So-hee, while Joo Un-sook, a master singer, continues the tradition of Dongchoje Pansori Simcheongga, which was taught by Lee Il-joo.
  • 2004.9.10
    Designated date
    Born in 1955, Lee Eun-kyu was studied by Yoo Geun-young, Lee Eun-gu and others. Buan Yuchun-ri Kiln Site is famous for producing Goryeo celadon with Gangjin Sadang-ri, and Yi Eun-gyu is striving to recreate the reputation of the old Goryeo celadon and to produce new works.
  • 2004.9.10
    Designated date
    Born in Buan in 1935, Kim Jeong-rak was taught Korean traditional architecture by potters Kim Hyung-oh, Kim Young-sun, and Ko Taek-young from childhood.

    The head of a ranch refers to a carpenter who performs the art of building a house with timber and finishing and trimming timber according to the technique. The lower part of the head of a ranch is composed of left and right sides.

    Kim Jeong-rak has been engaged in hanok architecture in the Jeolla provinces and other areas of the Jeolla provinces for more than 50 years, especially in Confucian architecture such as Seowon, Hyanggyo and Jaesil.