K-Cultural Heritage 7 Page > Little Korea

K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 2013.12.31
    designated date
    Suryukjae (Land and Water Rite) began to be performed during the early Joseon Period (1392-1910) to guide all the spirits of beings that lived in both water and land to the peaceful other world. The rite has high historical and cultural significance and aesthetic merit as provided by, among other old texts, Joseon wangjo sillok (Annals of the Joseon Dynasty); it is performed night and day for the peace of the entire living and the dead. On the other hand, the Yeongsanjae (Celebration of Buddha's Sermon on Vulture Peak Mountain) was performed for the peace of individual beings.

    Jingwansa Temple in Seoul had been a main venue for such rites, which were commissioned by the royal family of Joseon. It preserves the heritage, including the altar and architectural adornments as well as ceremonial proceedings.
  • 2019.12.31
    designated date
    The hemp cloth refers to the whole process of weaving hemp cloth from a textile raw material called marijuana, which is a fabric worn by ancestors from the time of the Three Han Dynasty by hand by the three Han Dynasty due to its advantages of absorbing sweat quickly, drying quickly, and being cool due to its good ventilation and high heat conductivity, and its durability against friction makes it less damaged when washing. Among them, Andongpo, produced in Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do, was a royal product of the Joseon Dynasty and was designated as a local specialty.

    ※ Since hemp was a collective technology that was produced through the collaboration of villagers, not individuals, and passed down to later generations, he did not recognize a particular holder and recognized a holding organization (a group without a holder).
  • 2012.12.31
    designated date
    The term "gung market" refers to a person with the ability to make bows and arrows, and the person who makes bows is referred to as "gungjang" and "the person who makes arrows" is referred to as "mayor." On September 13, 1971, Korea designated Kim Jang-hwan as "Gung Market Important Intangible Cultural Property No. 47" and continued its tradition.

    He joined his family in connection with the late Kim Jang-hwan and devoted himself to making the palace for more than 40 years. Currently, he has raised two students to produce the palace in Ansan and Gwangju, Gyeonggi Province, respectively.
  • 1982.12.31
    designated date
    An oil painting is one of the folk songs handed down to some parts of Chungcheong-do, and is a labor song sung by farmers to forget their fatigue and improve their efficiency. Singing individually or collectively, the song may vary depending on the region.

    The oil painter is also called Menari, which is said to have been derived from the old folk song "Mona-ri is the Han-chul," and from the old folk song "Mona-ri is the Han-chul." Other names include the munol flower and water parsley. This folk song has been subdivided by the elderly. It is a song about the sadness of losing the kingdom (Baekje) and longing for the country, so it gives a sad and pathetic feeling. It is called as a type of exchange between men and women, and is thought to have been called not only rice planting and seaweed fulvescens, but also without labor.

    The oil-producing artists were designated as intangible cultural assets to protect and inherit the labor songs that contain the thoughts and sorrows of ordinary people. In addition to Park Hong-nam, an entertainment holder living in Buyeo, two others are continuing their careers.
  • 1987.12.31
    designated date
    Nongak is the music played by farmers when they work with Du-re (an organization for community work) and refers to the music played by percussion instruments such as kkwa-ri, Jing-gu, Janggu, and drum.

    Buan Nongak, a type of Honam Udo Nongak, has the characteristics of Honam Udo Nongak, Gyeongnam Nongak, and Gyeonggi Nongak, so its music and dance performances are perfectly organized. The rhythm also has the middle characteristics of Honam Udo Nongak and Gyeongsang-do Nongak, so there are many lively rhythms.

    Currently, Na Mo-nyeo, a holder of Buan Nongak's entertainment, is an entertainer of Sangsoe who commands the Nongak band with his chopsticks, and has a variety of dance moves and their compositions and techniques. His iron sound is regarded as the sound of the Divine Spirit touching, and his movements are likened to a fully-cooked fairy play.
  • 1993.12.31
    designated date
    Dongnae Rubber is a drum dance that is handed down in Dongnae-gu, Busan. Although it was performed by the gisaengs of Gyobangcheong, which was in charge of court music during the early Goryeo Dynasty, it was introduced as Gyobang of Dongnae Gamyeong during the Joseon Dynasty and was called Dongnae Rubber depending on the characteristics of the region. According to the records recorded in "Goryeo Temple" and "The Akji," drumming was created by a nobleman named "Debate," who lived in exile during the reign of King Chungnyeol of Goryeo (1274-1308), as a raft that floated down to the sea was the origin of drum dance.

    Dongnae Rubber puts a big drum in the center and four dancers dance to the Yeongsan Hoesanggok, Janyeongsan Mountain, Yeombuldodry, and Taryeong Military Music, while four other dancers mingle and dance together singing Jihwaja. The dance moves include the head son-in-law, the birim son-in-law, the custom son-in-law, the side room, the rank-and-file son-in-law, the eight-man-law, the relative dance, the drum dance son-in-law, and the situation of the person. The dance is delicate and elegant under the influence of the royal court, and the composition of the dance is monotonous, varied, and colorful.

    Dongnae Rubber is a type of dance in the middle genre, not a pure folk dance, but a type of Gyobangmu. Currently, the Busan Folk Arts Preservation Association is striving to succeed and preserve the art.
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    A bedline refers to a stitch in a needle, which is the whole of the doubles. Clothing is a generic term for clothing and decorations, so the scope includes everything that can be made of sewing by threading a needle. The person who has this technique and its function is called a bedclothes.

    It is said that it was before history that people started sewing. The Silla-era metalwork, similar to the current needle, was excavated, and a significant level of bedding during the Three Kingdoms Period is well illustrated by the murals of Goguryeo and the "Samguk sagi." The Goryeo and Joseon Periods were further developed and passed down to this day.

    The necessary tools for the bedding include cloth, needle, thread, failure, thimble, scissors, ruler, iron, iron, nail needle, etc. As for fabrics, silk, cotton, ramie, and linen are mainly used. In fact, we use a lot of cotton yarn, but silk sewing always uses silk thread. The choice of yarn depends on the material, color, thickness, etc. of the fabric.

    The stitching method is basic persimmon and groove, stitching, topsoil, whipping, and balling, etc., and the necessary stitching method is used depending on the area of the garment. According to seasonal changes, seams are sewn thinly in summer, and cotton is added in spring and fall to make warm clothes. In particular, our clothes have features that highlight the beauty of the detailed plane and curve.

    In the past, all women had to know how to do the needlework, so the needle method continued to be practiced in the house and learned how to do it. There were times when the technique was passed down in the royal court due to bedrooms, but it was generally inherited by the family and is now impossible.

    On December 31, 1996, Park Gwang-hoon was recognized as the holder of the function of the intangible cultural asset burial site and passed down our unique burial technique. On August 10, 2017, he was recognized as an honorary holder.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb
  • 1990.12.31
    designated date
    This liquor is made of rice with lotus leaves, and lotus petals have a unique scent, so it is called lotus leaves.

    It is a liquor made from brewing technology that was used by Yean Yi Mun, who lives in Oeam-ri village. The village was inhabited by Yean Yi Clan from generation to generation, and a manuscript written by Yi Won-jip (1829-1879), the founder of the Yi Ik-seon, recorded the method of manufacturing lotus wine, but it is not known exactly when the brewing method began.

    Mix 7.2kg of rice and 1.8kg of glutinous rice to make and cool rice and mix 4.5kg of yeast. After drying the pot with fire, put 500 milligrams of lotus leaves in the pot first, then add mixed rice and pour 18 liters of clean underground water.

    After 30 days of making alcohol, you can get about a whole bowl of alcohol when you drink water. Be careful not to use bottled water when you make lotus wine, or you may rest in hot weather, so make it when the leaves are not dry before the frost. If you make it like this, alcohol does not change even in spring and summer.

    Asan lotus wine is now handed down by Choi Hwang-gyu.
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    Embroidery is a field that has developed along with doubles along human aesthetic desires, and refers to the work of using needles to place patterns in five-color yarn on top of fabrics. A person with the technique of embroidery and its function is called an embroidery field.

    Embroidery, developed from ancient times along with religious decorations or costumes of ceremonial events, has been applied to clothing since the Buyeo period before the Three Kingdoms Period. During the Three Kingdoms Period, the "Samguk Sagi" recorded that Goguryeo wore silk clothes embroidered during a gathering of government officials. From the Unified Silla Period and the Goryeo Period to the Joseon Dynasty, embroidery has been widely used in the decorative functions of household goods beyond the scope of medical life.

    The embroidery colored yarn is made by twisting the yarn extracted by the cocoon with other threads, which adjusts the thickness, thickness, and slack accordingly depending on the type of embroidery. Dyeing was a natural dye, so it shows a unique pictorial appearance with beautiful and soft colors.

    Embroidery is an artistic work that requires sincerity, patience, and concentration, and goes beyond simple handicrafts. Han Yeong-hwa was recognized as the holder on December 31, 1996 and became the honorary holder on September 10, 2008.

    ※For more information on the above cultural assets, please contact the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (☎02-2133-2616).
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    A knot is a person who has the skill of making various kinds of knots or putting on alcohol using a string.

    The string refers to the weaving of three or more strings together with several strands of thread. Alcohol is used to decorate the bottom of a string or knot, and is used for various musical instruments and Buddhist vessels. A knot used as a decoration for a costume or ritual utensils is also called an answer or a defect.

    The origin of the knot can be seen from primitive times, but whether the purpose is for decoration or practical purposes, the knot technique that has continued to this day was introduced through China during the Three Kingdoms Period. The records of "Daejeon Hoe-tong" show that there was a knot belonging to the state during the Joseon Dynasty.

    The materials for the knot include silk thread, ramie yarn, doctor's room, hempecil, and wool, and vary in shape depending on the color, thickness, and texture of the string. The name varies depending on the region.

    The name of the knot comes from all kinds of objects, flowers, and insect names that we easily see and use, including raw fish, butterflies, dragonflies, and chrysanthemum mates. Alcohol also varied according to its use, including daughter skills, sewing, hoppaesul, and bell wine, and even the same type of alcohol had different dignity depending on the court and locality.

    The knot was designated as an intangible cultural asset to protect and transfer traditional craftsmanship. On December 31, 1996, Kim Eun-young was recognized as the holder of the intangible cultural asset knotting function and passed down our unique knotting method, and was recognized as an honorary holder on November 16, 2017.

    ※For more information on the above cultural assets, please contact the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (☎02-2133-2616).
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    A najeon is a type of shell that is thinly ground and attached to objects in various patterns. In Korea, the native word "jagae" is used. Najeon lacquerware refers to a craft made by attaching a najeon pattern to an object and lacquering the top, and Najeonjang refers to a person with such skills or functions.

    It is assumed that the technique of najeon lacquerware was introduced in the Tang Dynasty of China. In Korea, a large amount of lacquerware was excavated from ancient tombs dating back to the Silla Period, and the lacquerware from the Baekje and Samhan periods were also excavated, suggesting that it was widely used as a common household container in the Three Kingdoms Period.

    According to the production process, a wooden frame for crafts such as a dressing table and a statue of a teacher is made of white bones. Rub the surface of the white bone evenly with sandpaper, then apply the chill porridge to fill the gap in the white bone and attach the shell to the white bone. It is then completed through the process of polishing, lacquer and polishing. The method of making patterns is to make a geometric pattern by attaching a small-cut top like a thread to a white bone, and to make a chrysanthemum, turtle, etc. shape by grinding the shell with a saw and a geometric pattern. During the Goryeo Dynasty and the early Joseon Dynasty, most of the plants were peonies, chrysanthemums, and lotus flowers, while most of the designs were made in the mid-Joseon period, including hwajo, Ssanghak, grape, plum, and sagunja. Recently, interest in traditional crafts has been rising, and they have been gradually resuscitating them with daily crafts.

    On August 10, 2004, Chung Myung-chae was recognized as the holder.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    Ojuk is a bamboo that has long been regarded as a sacred symbol of the Chunghyojeongjeol, which has been called jajuk in China and black porridge in Japan. The color of the ojuk is very beautiful and varied, and the surface is also an excellent material that does not require painting. A person who has the skill and ability to make craftwork with these porridge is called Ojukjang.

    It is used to cut down bamboo trees that are at least five years old and dry them for more than five years to make bamboo fields, and what can be used as a whole is used to dry them for more than 10 years, so that they do not burst and go bad even after a long period of time.

    Ojukjang is a traditional craftsmanship. On December 31, 1996, Yun Byung-hoon was recognized as the holder of the function of Ojukjang, an intangible cultural asset, and was recognized as an honorary holder on April 13, 2017.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    Supermarket refers to a person who has the skill and function of making granite. Hwamunseok refers to a mat that is hand-wrapped and cut according to the pattern of a dyed royal bone.

    Hwamunseok was used in the summer mainly because of its smooth and cool exterior, and was also used in the winter due to its coldness and warmth. Silla already had a government office in charge of the production of hwamunseok, and during the Goryeo Dynasty, it was widely known to foreign countries and even sent hwamunseok with dragon patterns to the Liaoning Dynasty of China as a special product. By the Joseon Dynasty, the demand for hwamunseok increased.

    The process of making hwamunseok is first dried up for three or four days. When it dries white and glows, soak it in water for a day, then wash it off and dye it. Hwamunseok is composed of squares or rectangles, so there is no change in shape and only a different pattern. The number of people wearing this depends on the width.

    As of December 31, 1996, Han Soon-ja was recognized as the holder of the Intangible Cultural Property, and as of September 21, 2017, there was no holder.

    ※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616)
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    Silver factory refers to a person who has the skill of making crafts with silver.

    Silver crafts include jewelry, earrings, jangdo, binyeo, and rings used by women, as well as daily items such as silver spoon, silver jugal, bowl, waste white kettle, silver tray, and silver carving. The methods of shaping silver artifacts include a variety of colored silica powder on a silver basis, and a black cloth with various patterns and gold.

    The carving techniques used in silver crafts include inlaid and inlaid, which are made by digging grooves into metal surfaces and inserting silver into them. A particle is a sculpting technique that pecks metal surfaces with chisel to make them rough, attaches silver to them, and then pecks them with chisel again to make patterns and peel off the rest.

    As of December 31, 1996, Kim Won-taek was recognized as the owner of the silver factory. On August 7, 2006, Lee Jung-hoon was recognized as the holder on September 10, 2008. As of September 23, 2017, there is no holder.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb
  • 1996.12.31
    designated date
    A folk painting refers to a practical painting drawn according to daily life and customs, focusing on the decoration of living space, and the person who paints such folk painting is called a folk painting. Folk paintings were especially popular in the late Joseon Dynasty, as paintings by ordinary people and the working class. Most of them were painted by unknown or wandering artists who did not study painting properly, so there is no optimism (painting a name or an arc) of the painter.

    Folk paintings have been continuously painted over the years, deeply rooted in the lives of ordinary people from the upper court to the lower court. The material is also diverse, so there is no limit to the material. From landscape, flower, and genre paintings simply for decorative purposes to folklore, Buddhism, and Confucian folk paintings, the subject matter is endless. As a characteristic of technique, it was painted by an unprofessional artist, so the spatial composition is diverse and free. It also has few dark and dull colors, bright and clear, primary and colorful.

    Folk paintings have long been preserved as the most intimate joy of life by portraying materials related to Korean thought, faith and life. Minhwajang was designated as an intangible cultural asset as a folk craft technique that reflects and expresses the thoughts of ordinary people. On December 31, 1996, Kim Man-hee was recognized as the holder of the civil cremation function of intangible cultural heritage and passed down our unique folk painting techniques, and was recognized as an honorary holder on April 13, 2017.

    bbb※※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616). </bb