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K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 2013.12.31
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    Stone structures refer to the foundations of the base, such as the base, stone, stone, and hexagonal axes where wooden structures are built. In order to build a stone structure, the strength, water pressure, and acupressure of the stone must be taken into account and the geometric principle must be understood. To become a master of stone structures, one must go through a long probationary period, overcome physical exhaustion, and have long experience and innate qualities.

    Im Dong-jo is one of the few craftsmen who continue the tradition of building stone structures in Korea. In 1969, at the age of 15, he began to learn to work with his brother-in-law, who was working on stone structures. In particular, a brother-in-law of mentor, angio was damaged during Japanese occupation in 1968, Gwanghwamun restoration project who participated in the craftsman. Gwanghwamun, which was restored at that time, moved 13 meters east of Gwanghwamun in 2006 as part of a project to find its original location.

    At that time, the owner was in charge of the relocation and restoration of the Six Axis of Gwanghwamun.

    In addition to the base and hexagonal axis of wooden buildings, Im Dongjo also implements tasks such as dismantling and repairing already installed stone structures such as piers, handrails and stone pagodas by applying traditional techniques. In recognition of this ability, he participated in the restoration project of the five major palaces in Seoul. Recently, he was in charge of creating the foundation of the stone pagoda in the dismantling and restoration project of the Stone Pagoda in Mireuksa Temple Site.
  • 2009.12.31
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    Hwanggeum-ri, Damyang, is a typical rural village located in the middle of a wide field in the upper reaches of the Yeongsangang River. It is a village with a wide field and rich property, and has a unique artistic tradition, and the songs sung while farming rice paddies are being handed down.

    Damyang's Golden Driedle Song covers the entire process of steaming unknowns, planting unknowns, tying rice paddies, and jangwonjil. And each song is composed of late sounds and frequent sounds, especially in the non-maggi area, various songs such as <Jihwasori>, <Tteol소리, <Nahesori소리, and 사Sadu YeoSori소리 are arranged. The composition and composition of the songs are well illustrated by the fact that they have been passed down with the style and spirit of folk art in Namdo. In particular, the transfer of various songs, including the mock-up song, which is hard to see in other regions, the collective spirit sung with strength and excitement, and the various and colorful musical composition and melody, illustrate the degree of tradition and artistry of the golden song.

    Damyang's Hwanggeum Deul song represents the upper reaches of the Yeongsangang River. The tradition of folk art in the Yeongsangang River basin, which is the lifeline of South Korea, is preserved intact. It is a well-known wild song for its participation in the 13th Namdo Cultural Festival since 1983 and the 26th National Folk Arts Competition in 1985.

    Nam Gwi-hee (born in 1948), a singer-songwriter, succeeded her father's entertainment and has been leading the Golden Singing Performance since her 30s, and is a native musician who has been living in Geumgeum-ri for three generations as a local musician with excellent singing ability. And residents of Hwanggeum-ri have a special passion for preserving wild songs. The village of Hwangyum has organized the Wild Song Preservation Society and established the Wild Song Training Center to continue the transmission.

    As such, Hwang-Yi-Yum's wild song is well equipped with songs that correspond to the whole process of rice paddy farming, and has the characteristics of wild songs that belong to the upper reaches of the Yeongsangang River and inland areas of South Jeolla Province, which have academic value comparable to wild songs in the islands and coastal areas of South Jeolla Province, is well expressed by male singers, and is a collective labor art for the preservation of wild singing. In addition, it is necessary to recognize Nam Gwi-hee as an entertainment holding organization, Damyang Golden Ddeul Song Preservation Society, and as an entertainment holder.
  • 2013.12.31
    designated date
    Dongducheon Folk Song was designated as a cultural asset by combining folk songs that were handed down around Dongducheon. This includes a variety of folk songs, including a ritual for rain, a ritual for rain, and a play for Baekjung nori. In addition, not only folk songs passed down to one village, but also the sounds that were passed down to another nearby village are all grouped together.

    In the old days, when it was time for unknowns, it was dark and rainy, so the women who gave birth to their first son in the village went out to the stream with their height and said, "The sound of rain in the water." In this way, he believed that God of Heaven would let the rain down. The sound of "Mulkaburi" is divided into the sound of Bokshin and the sound of "Animal Call." The lyrics suggest that it is a piece of music of the Binari family, and the actual melody of the song is sung on the Changbu Taryeongjo.

    When planting rice paddies, ' 모 모 모 모' is called '훠훠소리소리' which is the sound of planting rice plants. Non-maegi is performed three times a year. The first non-maegi is called "Gianta-ryeong," the second non-maegi is called "Gilbang-at-ryeong," and the third non-maegi is called "Ginbang-an-at-ryeong." At the end of the rice paddy season in Baekjung, people wash and store homies that they have used. Under the ginkgo tree in the village, they sing "Ninano Bangataryeong" while playing with Nongak in hopes of a good harvest.

    The funeral service calls for the bier-carrying bier, which is divided into "old bier sound," "modern bier sound," and "old bier sound." They also sing "The Sound of the Moon Riding" and "The Sound of the Earth Closing" to create the tomb, and at the end of the Moon Riding, they sing "The Sound of the Bird" to prevent evil. Dongducheon Folk Songs have well-known local characteristics such as folk games and folk songs in northern Gyeonggi Province.
  • 2014.1.1
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    Since 1973, Bae has been engaged in the production of Dongnae Traditional Kites and kite flying for more than 40 years. Bae Moo-sam was confirmed to have continued the succession of Lee Soo-yong and Han Tae-jeong in the field of Dongnae Traditional Lanterns as the late Dongnae Yaryu owner Jang Mun-won testified in his lifetime that he had been taught the production function of Dongnae Traditional Lanterns by Han Tae-jeong and Park Yun-su for more than a decade.

    Korean traditional kites can be largely divided into 'Bangpaeyeon' and 'Gaoliyeon'. Although Dongnaeyeon is not much different from traditional kites, Dongnae area with the sea is a place with strong winds in winter, so the standard of kites is made in the ratio of 2:3, 5:7, and 7:9, which is golden division shape. The kites are placed in two layers, are round, and the kites are not flat, and the lotus is shaped like a circle to make the light.

    Bae Moo-sam has his own unique traditional kite production function and is fully qualified to designate and recognize intangible cultural assets designated by Busan Metropolitan City, as he has a distinct family tree, and is producing 'Meoriyeon' with a red and black 1/4 won painting on the tail of the kite.
  • 2014.1.1
    designated date
    Suyeongji Sinsinbapgi is a folk game that was held on the fifteenth day of the first lunar month, as well as a ritual to pray for the safety of the village and the welfare of the residents by visiting the Gaga Lake in Suyeong-dong more than 250 years ago.

    The participants are 30 musicians and 21 mixed colors, followed by Dangsanpuri, Wellmulpuri, Insagut, Madangbapgi, Seongjupuri, Jowangpuri, Jangdokpuri, Gokganpuri, Jeongnangpuri, Sapjappuri, Pannori, and Jegigakje. The melody is elegant and deep, and the sound is less sour than other regions, which clearly reveals the sound path of the Manarijo in Gyeongsang-do.

    In particular, the ritual for burning paper flags at the end of every ritual is held, which is a kind of ritual for burning the liquid while burning the flags used for the last jisinbapgi after all the rituals, and it is also a characteristic of Suyeong alone that the folk religion with ritualistic characteristics was more prevalent than other regions. In addition, the holders of the musical instruments are also highly skilled, consisting of professional entertainers such as Suyeong Yaryu.
  • 2014.1.1
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    Busan Gijang Ogugut is a memorial rite (Cheondoje) for the souls of the dead. It has a family rite and a room rite, and it consists of twelve streets, from Jeongjeonggut to Siseok. The dense blend of Buddhist contents and colors, such as salt Buddha, sophora, jasam, and rhythm, has a unique characteristic that can be compared with the Buddhist ritualistic style, and shows the unique historical perspective of Koreans.

    Along with the private pool of Haewon and Cheorwon, it is an important cultural and artistic heritage that provides unique characteristics of the region along with the universality of the Korean culture and arts, as it has the unique life and dance spirit of Korean shamanism, which invokes the spirit of Salpuri, the extreme form of singing, dancing, and various shapes, and sends death.

    Muui and Muga holders Kim Dong-eon has a clear lineage of succession, and has outstanding skills in Ogugut's unique private pool, as well as outstanding skills in Ogugut's unique private pool, while Kim Dong-ryul, a holder of musicians and Jihwa production, is paired with Kim Dong-eon in musical performance and rhythm, and is fully qualified as a holder in the production of Jihwa, Yongseon and Mugu.
  • 2013.1.3
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    Sambegilssam refers to the process of women weaving fabrics using hemp at home.
    Depending on the type of fabric, they are also called Sambegilssam, Mosi Gilssam, and Mumyeong Gilssam.

    Gilsam was practiced throughout the country except for parts of Hamgyeong-do. This fabric was one of the rich sources of income for farmers, but as chemical fibers developed, the number of hemp-growing farms decreased, and the hemp-gill ssam was also forgotten by people.

    Geochang-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do, had a long tradition of producing sambegil ssam since the Three Kingdoms Period, but the development of chemical fibers naturally led to its decline. Nevertheless, farms that grow crops in some areas such as Uhye-ri, Gabuk-myeon, Geochang-eup, and Galgye-ri, Buksang-myeon, still remain. Lee Ok-su (Geochang Sambegil Ssam Preservation Association) has been learning hemp-gil ssam from his grandmother and mother-in-law since he was born, and continues to make hemp-gil ssam. To summarize the process of Geochang Sambegil Ssam, the following is the case.

    The work process will be carried out in the order of one-three-leafing, two-three-pronged (pump), three-dried, four-trees making, five-toothed, six-three-toothed, seven-wheel, eight-thread carrying, nine-bread, and ten-baking.
  • 2013.1.3
    designated date
    Eosan refers to the sound that constitutes a Buddhist ritual, commonly called Beompae or Beomum. The reason why Eosan Mountain is called Beompae is because Buddhist music originated in India, which originated from singing the praise and praise of Buddha's virtues.

    It was during the Wei Dynasty of China that the term Assan was used. King Jinsik (A.D. 192-232) is said to have been defeated for the first time, and one day, he was walking through Shandong province's

    On January 3, 2013, Lee trillion won was recognized as a holder of the company.

    ※ For detailed information on the above cultural assets, please refer to the Seoul Metropolitan Government Department of Historical and Cultural Heritage (202-2133-2616)
  • 2017.1.4
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    Ssireum (Korean Wrestling) is a traditional Korean folk sport in which two wrestlers, each holding the other’s satba (belt), strive to beat their opponent by bringing his body to the ground. Based on the Korean people’s unique community culture, various forms of the sport have handed down until today.

    As a representative folk game of Korea, the historicity of ssireum has been clearly identified through diverse relics, documents, and paintings ranging from the ancient Three Kingdoms period to the modern era. In addition, the composition of the match and the techniques of ssireum express the uniqueness of Korean wrestling.
  • 2008.1.4
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    Namsong Park Kang-yong, the 13th holder of lacquerware in North Jeolla Province, made a lacquerware workshop in Namwon in 1992 and has commissioned a lacquer craft museum from Namwon City since 2005 and has been devoting all his energy to research lacquer, work, and training young people.

    Park Kang-yong, who started lacquer work at the age of 14 due to poor family circumstances, has been working on lacquerware for 40 years. The teacher has been walking this path for decades, and has also been working hard to cultivate his juniors. Thinking that building a person is the only way to inherit and develop lacquerware, it has always been recommended that you develop your own unique techniques instead of staying with the skills you have learned from your juniors.

    It is in the field of "refined painting" that the teacher was recognized as the holder of the intangible cultural asset lacquerware. Since ancient times, lacquer has been refined and used freely by the lacquerware itself, and "refining" is a process of filtering out foreign substances from the lacquer tree, which becomes "refined paint."
  • 1996.1.5
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    Nongyo is a song that is sung to forget fatigue and improve efficiency while working on rice paddies and fields, also known as "deulsong" or "farming sound." Singing individually or collectively as one of the folk songs, the song may vary depending on the region.

    Yeongdong's "Design-ri Nongyo" is a song that has been passed down from mouth to mouth since a long time ago, with the sound of mochi, rice planting, and rice paddies. Mochi is a song that is sung while steaming rice seedlings and planting rice seedlings. Non-maegi songs are divided into two types, a cho-beol-mae-gi and a du-beol-mae-gi, which are sung by many people when a person carries a catfish. The catfish is responsible for meaningful content, and the receiver is responsible for meaningless margin. These differences result from different behaviors in labor.

    Yeongdong Design-ri Nongyo is a song that originated geographically close to Jeollabuk-do and Gyeongsangbuk-do, and the rhythms of Nongyo are mixed in color.
  • 2004.1.5
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    Sculpture refers to a craftsman who used to work as a sculptor in air conditioning, teaching, and public sentiment.

    Sculpture is a technique in which lines or sides are dug up with iron strips and patterns are made on the surface. In Korean, it is a technique that decorates surfaces such as gold or sweet gold.

    There are many techniques such as flat, hexagonal, tapestry, high angle, and inlaid.
  • 2004.1.5
    designated date
    Calligraphy refers to engraving letters on trees or stones, and it is a craftsman who does this work. The calligraphy is no different from the duties of the head of each chapter, which originally used to engrave letters in order to withdraw books or engrave Pyeonaek. In other words, it is an alias given to each person as they move toward the realm of art that they hang on the wall and appreciate recently. Each area varies from small stamps to individual withdrawals and hanging pyeonaeks on buildings. However, each withdrawal is different in that each letter is engraved upside down for printing.

    Korea's individual technology is widely known for excellence along with printing technology. Among the woodblocks, "Mugujeonggwangdae dharani Sutra" produced during the Unified Silla Period (751), is the oldest artifact, and many Confucian woodblocks of the Joseon Dynasty, including the Tripitaka Koreana of Haeinsa Temple during the Goryeo Dynasty, are reported. Of course, it has become a channel through which knowledge is spread through woodblocks. Recalling that metal types were also made of mother and mother type, each of them played a significant role.

    The most suitable trees for each are mountain cherry trees, jujube trees, birch trees, pear trees, and sputum trees. This is because the pattern is low in bumps and hard and tough wood is required. To engrave letters on the woodblock, a delicate process is first needed to control the properties of the material. It was an old way to soak in seawater or mudflats for years or boil them in a pot. However, in traditional Korean culture, instead of hammering the back of a knife, it was common to push or pull a knife.

    Gajangjang was designated as a national intangible cultural heritage by the late Oh Ok-jin and Kim Gak-han. Gajeongjang was designated as Gajangjang in various regions. Lee Gyu-nam, the 40th calligrapher in Gyeonggi Province, was recognized as the holder in 2004. Yi Gyu-nam learned from Oh Ok-jin and Shin Hak-gyun, and from Kim Chung-hyeon, he restored various pieces of Pyeonaek and woodblocks.
  • 2017.1.5
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    Mueul nongak is a nongak handed down in the Mueul-myeon area of Gumi. Mueul-myeon was called Mueul-dongbang during the Silla Period (121), and was renamed Pungheon around 676. It was called Mueulbang during the Joseon Dynasty, and it was changed to Myeonri-dong Consolidation in 1914 to this day.

    Jeong Jae-jin, who had the greatest influence on Muul nongak, is said to be a Buddhist monk at Sudasa Temple in Sangsong-ri. During the reign of King Yeongjo of the Joseon Dynasty, Jeong Jae-jin, a Buddhist monk at Sudasa Temple, made pungmul rhythms based on what he had dreamed of and what was handed down, and spread them to nearby villages.

    However, it is hard to say that today's Muul nongak was formed only by his simple transmission of iron. This is because in traditional rural communities, nongak naturally appears in dongje and jisinbapgi.

    It is estimated that even in Muul, the village dongje, jisinbapgi, and rice paddies performed "homi-gul" ("trickling") to create a pungmul board. Therefore, Muul Nongak, which is currently handed down, is a complex content related to various events in the village.
  • 2017.1.5
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    Boin Nongak is a typical farming ritual in the southern part of Gyeongsangbuk-do, but unlike other regions, it has a special character that has developed character play.

    Thus, the delicacy of the rhythm of Dengdeokgung Palace and the three-chambae rhythm are harmonized, and the unique Byul-Da-Dragon and Deutbo-Gi rhythm form the main melody, creating a splendid and grand sound.

    These characteristics of Boin Nongak are understood to be well worth preserving and inheriting in the future, and its value as a cultural asset is recognized.