K-Cultural Heritage 6 Page > Little Korea

K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

  • 1996.3.29
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    Nongak is the music played by farmers when they work with Du-re (an organization for community work) and refers to the music played by farmers playing percussion instruments such as kkwa-ri, Jing-gu, Jang-gu, and drums.

    Gimje Nongak is a type of Honam Udo Nongak that is distributed throughout Gimje. Nongak was handed down in the form of Daedonggut from early on, but it was developed into a more specialized group of entertainers. It is characterized by the use of iron and janggu as the main instrument in the composition of the Nongak band, the use of large drums, and the development of duregut in the plains area.

    Currently, Park Pan-yeol and one other person in Gimje Nongak are recognized as the entertainment holders.
  • 1996.3.29
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    The roots of Jeonbuk dance are mainly based on Kibang Dance, and so is Honam Salpuri Dance. In particular, Choi Jeong-cheol's Salpuri dance (tentative name: Choi Sun) is a dance that transformed the towel dance learned from his teacher into a stage dance for a long time. His dance is deeply rooted in the emotions of Han, and his high self-control, along with the beauty of making, solving, and freezing, illustrates the characteristics of dance.

    Choi Jeong-cheol started dancing when he was 10 years old in 1945, entered the Kim Mi-hwa Dance Research Institute in 1946, held a dance presentation for the first time at the Jeonju Provincial Theater in 1960, opened the best dance institute in 1961, and was designated as the holder of the Dojeong Intangible Cultural Property Honam Salpul Dance in 1996.

    Currently, the school is dedicated to training its students for dance transfer through its lectures at various universities and colleges, and it is firmly establishing its position as a renowned dancer, <span class='xml2' onmouseover='up2 (1535)' onmouseout='dn2('dn2(')명명명명명명명span>.
  • 2002.4.6
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    The Tang painting was a reverent and beautiful portrayal of Buddhist materials and doctrines. It achieved the highest technical completion in the Goryeo Dynasty, which was renowned around the world. During the Joseon Dynasty, it became a popular art.

    The Jeolla region has long been known for its as well as monk Yoo Sam-young, a skilled craftsman, has been producing many works in Jeolla-do and Jeju-do for more than 30 years since taking the tanghwa class from Mon Eung. His tangs are subject matter-specific in each category. In particular, the traditional two-line colors and colors are used to maintain the traditional culture faithfully.
  • 2012.4.27
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    Iksan Mokbal Song is a folk song handed down from Iksan and was sung by woodcutters who used to beat on crutches, the legs of the Jigae. A crutches song refers to a song that combines six songs, including Santa-ryeong, dorsal song, jigae-gi-taryeong, dongdang-taryeong, and sangsa-sori.

    The crutches have different rhythms of tunes, as the songs vary depending on the woodcutters' heavy loads, light loads, and when they go out to an empty fork. When cutting down trees or grass, they sing Santa-ryeong of the slow Jinyang Jojangdan, and then when they come down carrying a tree, they sing the slow Jungmori rhythm's back song. When returning to the village or when there is a fresh breeze with a stick of wood, they sing a jigaemokbal song by Auckmori rhythm, a jigaegi rhythm by Gutgeori rhythm, a dongdanggi rhythm and a sangsa sound.

    Iksan Mokbal Song is a precious song that has been likened to the flower of agricultural culture, Park Gap-geun, who lives in Iksan, has been recognized as a holder of entertainment and continues his career.
  • 1987.4.28
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    Lee Kang-ju, a representative native of our hometown, is believed to have been successful since the mid-Joseon Dynasty. As for the manufacturing methods and taste of rice wine, it is well illustrated in 16 executive papers, Dongguk Sesigi, and Myeongju in Korea.

    Jeonju Yi Gangju first distills 30 degree soju using clear and clean water, wheat and white rice. Then, apply each extract of 20 grams of ginger, 3.75 grams of cinnamon and 7.7 grams of turmeric, as well as 5 juices in 30 degree order, and then combine them again with 600 milliliters per fructose to complete. Lee Gang-ju, which is made in this way, is loved by many people to this day by day.
  • 2013.5.24
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    It was designated as the No. 1 traditional Korean food master after 40 years of training at Suwangsa Temple and received awards at various traditional liquor fairs. It is currently striving to foster the younger generation through training.
  • 2013.5.24
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    Lee Gil-ju was born in Jeonju in 1950 and learned Korean dance by entering Choi Sun. Honam Sanjo Dance is a traditional dance of the Kibang system that connects Lee Chu-wol, Choi Seon-eun and Lee Gil-ju, and it is a dance that freely sublimates the Korean traditional dance, which is a representative characteristic of Korean dance that performs the best dance according to the improvised sancho performance.

    Lee has won a number of competitions including the Korean Dance Festival and the Sicily Dance Festival in Italy.
  • 2013.5.24
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    Kim Gwang-sook was born in 1944 and was taught dance by Jeong Hyeong-in, Choi Seon-eun, and Park Geum-seul. In particular, Park Geum-seul taught dance moves performed by government officials during the Joseon Dynasty. Kim Kwang-sook won a number of awards, including the Korean Dance Festival and the National Gugak Contest.

    "Raegimu" is a kind of playful dance in which girls in the classroom, who are exceptionally good at playing music, dance to cheer up the participants at parties or play fields.

    This dance is also known as Gyobang Dance, and a gisaeng (gisaeng dance) must not only have a high level of talent but also have a good sense of humor that makes it easy to enjoy.

    There are many dances, such as mouth dance, gutgeori dance, and towel dance, which were called the Buddhist monk dance and sword dance, and there are dances in which people dance with double fans, towels, and plates in turn, which are also called plate dances.