North Jeolla Province Intangible Cultural Property No. 12 Musical Instruments

K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

North Jeolla Province Intangible Cultural Property No. 12 Musical Instruments +

Classification Intangible Cultural Property
Designated date 1995.9.20
location , Jeollabuk-do
The term "instrument head" means a person who has the skills or functions of making instruments used in traditional music, such as Janggu, Buk, Danso, Gayageum, Geomungo, etc. North Jeolla Province, the birthplace of Honam Nongak, has a regional characteristic of smooth production and distribution of high-quality pungmul instruments.

Janggu is a representative rhythm instrument imported from the Song Dynasty of China during the Goryeo Dynasty and is widely used in various fields to this day. Also called jango or seyogo, it is used as a material for horse skin and cowhide.

A drum is a musical instrument that is played with leather on a wooden container and knocks it together, often collecting various pieces of pine trees to squeeze the drum and putting cowhide on both sides. Most of the pieces used in court music were nailed down, but in the private sector, more were tied with leather straps.

The Danso is a wind instrument that is made of a pole. There are five holes, one at the top and four at the front, but the fourth hole at the front is not used. The range reaches two octaves, and the tone is clear and clear. It is also used as a solo instrument, but is mainly used for ensemble with other instruments in chamber music.

Gayageum is one of the most representative stringed instruments of its kind, and the Korean alphabet in the ancient literature is called Gayageum, and it is known as Beopgeum or Pungryu Yageum, which are used in Aak or Jeongak. The gayageum has 12 strings tied to silk thread on a narrow, long rectangular wooden board, and a small column of wood that can be easily moved by supporting the rope. The tone is clear and elegant, and has a wide range of performing techniques, so it is used in both aak and folk music.

Geomungo, also known as cash, was first produced by Wang Sanak in the third to fifth centuries by improving Chinese instruments. The oldest document on how to make it is written in "The Evil Trapezius," which states that the front panel of Geomungo is made of paulownia, chestnut wood, and walnut wood. Geomungo was produced by order, the method of making was handed down to the oral tradition, and it is assumed that the level of production skill was also high because it had to satisfy the demanding needs of the scholars compared to other instruments.

As a traditional craftsmanship, Go Yi-gon is recognized as the master of the Danso, Seo Nam-gyu as the master of the drum and janggu production, Kang Shin-ha as the master of janggu production, Choi Dong-sik as the master of geomungo production, and Ko Su-hwan as the master of the gayageum production.

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