North Jeolla Province Intangible Cultural Property No. 27-2 Taenghwa (Taenghwa, Yi Samyeol)

K-CULTURAL HERITAGE

Everlasting Legacies of Korea

North Jeolla Province Intangible Cultural Property No. 27-2 Taenghwa (Taenghwa, Yi Samyeol) +

Classification Intangible Cultural Property
Designated date 2010.5.28
location Iksan-si, Jeollabuk-do
Buddhist paintings are an important area of Buddhist art that is subject to worship at Buddhist temples along with Buddhist statues. After the introduction of Buddhism, Korean Buddhist paintings developed greatly in the form of murals and tangs. Especially during the Goryeo Dynasty, they were recognized as the highest-quality works in East Asia. A Tang painter is a person who paints Buddhist worldviews, such as portraits or scriptures of Buddha or Bodhisattva, which are common in temples. Along with the detailed description, the tanghwa is called a task that is almost a performance as it also requires careful attention to the use of colors.

Lee Sam-yeol was born in 1945 and was taught Korean Buddhist paintings by Kim Il-seop. He participated in the construction of Dancheong and Buddhist paintings in major temples across the country, including Geumjeongsa Temple in Busan, Gimje Geumsan Temple, Gyeongju Bulguksa Temple, Seoul Haknimsa Temple, Busan Seonamsa Temple, Yesan Sudeoksa Temple, Jeongeup Naejangsa Temple, Gochang Seonunsa Temple, Muju Anguk Temple, and Wanju Bongseo Temple.

Lee Sam-yeol faithfully inherits and creates the sketches from Kim Il-seop, and his character's expressive ability is outstanding, and his overall work is excellent, including writing and coloring.

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