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K-Pop & Trot (2)

  • 2020.6.15
    Billboard Ranking Day
    Daechuita is the title track of the second mix tape "D-2" released under the name of Just D by Suga, a member of the South Korean boy group BTS.

    It debuted in June 2020 at No. 11 on the Billboard album chart, and its title track 'Daechwita' was ranked 76th on the single chart.

    Daechwita was a piece of music that was used as an accompaniment when kings marched or troops marched during the Joseon Dynasty.
  • 1986.10.3
    release date
    [Lyric and Composed by Yang Hong-seop, Arranged by Kim Tae-won]

    It is a track from the first album 'Rock Will Never Die' released on October 3, 1986.

    It is one of the two songs that made a big hit on their debut album. The other is 'Bee and your story'

K-Traditional Music (12)

  • 2020.11.11
    Recommended music
    [Sori Me 6th Regular Concert]

    Ilseungwolhang is a song of the late Joseon Dynasty's annual music.

    Performance: Park Yong-ho, Jeon Myung-shin and Sorime members
  • 2020.11.17
    Recommended music
    Park Yong-tae (present name: Park Dae-sung) is a first-generation apprentice to Han Il-seop, the founder of the Ajaeng Sanjo, and the legitimacy of the Korean traditional music scene is clear, and there is no doubt about the legitimacy of the melody, and the general Sanjo is composed mainly of the rhythms of Gyemyeonseong Fortress, giving a feeling of pleading and desolation, but Park Yong-tae (Park Dae-tae's Aja's (pyeon's) has a strong sense of superiority.

    Intangible Cultural Property No. 16 designated by Busan Metropolitan City (designated on December 7, 2009)
  • 2020.12.1
    Recommended music
    Jongmyo Jerye is a festive ritual in which the king wishes the nation and the people to be peaceful with the help of heaven and earth, and Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to instrumental music, songs and dances performed to hold a solemn ceremony for Jongmyo Jerye.

    Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak were designated as Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 56 and No. 1, and were preserved and handed down as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity on May 18, 2001.

K-Cultural Heritage (288)

  • 1969.11.10
    designated date
    The Korean traditional music is composed of sijo poems (Korean traditional poetry) and sung to orchestral accompaniment. It is also known as 'Sakdaeyeop' or 'Song'.

    The original version of the song is Mandaeyeop, Jung Daeyeop, and Sakdaeyeop, but the slow song, Mandaeyeop, disappeared before the reign of King Yeongjo (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1676), which was not sung at the end of the Joseon Dynasty.

    The current song is derived from the "Sakdaeyeop," a fast song that appeared since the late Joseon Dynasty, and various rhythmical related songs have formed a five-piece collection of songs.

    Currently, 41 songs are handed down, including the Ujo and the Gyemyeonjo, 26 male and 15 female songs, but the female versions of the male and female songs are slightly modified so that women can sing the male and female songs, which are almost identical to the male chant. However, there is a difference between the melody that shows the delicacy of the female singer and the low-pitched voice.

    According to the format, a poem is divided into five chapters, and the prelude, a rental note, and a second, three, three, four, and five chapters are repeated. The highly organized and well-organized performance consists of geomungo, gayageum, haegeum, daegeum, danso, and janggu.

    Songs have been in existence for many years without change, and are of high artistic value that have been handed down by experts compared to other music being popular.
  • 1992.11.10
    designated date
    Soban is a small table of dishes that is used for various purposes from Korean diet to ritual ceremonies. The art of making soban or its craftsman is called sobanjang.

    Various types of tomb murals such as the Gakjeochong Tomb and the Dance Tomb of Goguryeo were found in various types of tomb murals. Records such as "Samguk Sagi," "Byeolsa" and "Gyeongguk Daejeon" indicate that the state-affiliated organizations were divided into two groups to produce the paintings. During the Joseon Dynasty, Buddhist statues were mainly used rather than statues due to the influence of Confucian ideology, and small and large statues were needed for various purposes such as rituals and weddings, which naturally led to the development of small and medium-sized soban production.

    The type of soban is classified into about 60 types depending on the area, type, and use of the soban. Haeju-ban, Naju-ban, Tongyeong-ban, Chungju-ban, and Gangwon-do. Haeju-ban is a sculpture-oriented soban, Naju-ban is a medium-sized soban, and Tongyeong-based soban is a rhyme-oriented one. In addition, in terms of bridge shape, Jukjeol-type (bamboo-shaped), Hojok-type (tiger-shaped), and Gujok-type (dog-shaped) in Gangwon-do and Gyeonggi-do are the main features.
  • 1995.11.10
    designated date
    The musical instrument, commonly known as the instrument used to play music, has been used in traditional music since the Three Kingdoms Period, and about 60 types of musical instruments have been introduced, including unique instruments from Korea, and foreign instruments imported from China, the West, and other regions. As Korea was adjacent to the northern continent, Chinese and Western music was already introduced during the Three Kingdoms Period. Especially after Silla unified the three kingdoms, Tang Dynasty music was imported.

    By the Goryeo Dynasty, Song Dynasty folk music and aak were imported, and by the time of King Yejong's reign, Ahak was introduced, and it still came in large quantities. These instruments were classified according to the main ingredients needed to make musical instruments in "Jeungbo Munheongo," and in particular, the musical instruments used for the unique traditional music, as well as the instruments used for Ahak and Dangak.

    By the Japanese invasion, national sovereignty was lost and court musicians became free men. Of course, unlike the heads of government-affiliated musical instruments who made Jeongak-centered instruments, Sanjo-centered instruments were being produced in the private sector. This sanjo instrument can be said to be for individual performance, making it more cheerful and easier to transport than a group-oriented Jeongak instrument. During the Japanese Colonial Period, Kim Myeong-chil was named in Jeonju, and Kim Boong-gi (Kim Hak-gi) was named in Jeongeup.

    After Korea's liberation from Japan's colonial rule, Kim Myeong-chil's technique was followed by his son Kim Gwang-ju, who became the No. 42 instrument master in 1971. He moved to Seoul to teach Choi Tae-gwi, Go Heung-gon, and Lee Young-soo before passing away in April 1984. Originally, Yi Yeongsu was designated as a cultural asset of Jeollabuk-do with the functions of Kim Bungi in Jeongeup, but he also received the functions of Kim Gwang-ju.

    The musical instrument director originally thought he would make all instruments, but now he is divided into a drum, a jango, a gong, a gong, a jing, a salted fish, a flute, a gayageum, a geomungo, and a haegeum.

K-History (21)

  • 1975.12.1
    Production commencement date
    Pony, Korea's first unique model, has become a touchstone for Korea today to stand shoulder to shoulder with the rest of the world in the ranks of automobile producers.

    Pony, which began production on Dec. 1, 1975, was 140 kilometers at a maximum speed, 1,238 cc in emissions and 2.289 million won at the time, at its Ulsan plant, which was created under Hyundai Motor's basic plan to build a comprehensive auto plant since 1973.

    The sleek fast-back style Pony, designed by Italian designer Georgeto Zizuaro, is regarded as the No. 1 domestic car that opened the doors of the Micah era in Korea while exporting its first overseas in 1976, starting with its first production of 50 units.
  • 1962.12.3
    Designated date
    It is a representative native dog of Korea that our ancestors have been raising since long ago in Jindo-gun, Jeollanam-do.

    Jindo dogs are 50 to 55cm tall for males and 45 to 50cm for females, and their heads and faces are octagonal in front of them, and their overall impression is mild.

    The ears are slightly tilted forward and stand upright, and the eyes are triangular and dark yellow or gray.

    The nose is almost black and has a light red color.

    Jindo dogs have a bold personality and are very sensitive to smell and hearing, making them suitable for hunting.

    It is also faithful and smart, and has a good nature of returning to where it lived even after going far away from where it lived, making it suitable for pets and keeping a house.

    It was designated and protected as Natural Monument No. 53 on December 3, 1962.

    In 1995, Jindo dogs were recognized as international protected breeding animals.
  • 1962.12.20
    designated date
    Cheomseongdae is a stone building of the mid-Silla period located in the northeastern part of Banwolseong Fortress in Gyeongju.

    The astronomical observatory of the Silla Dynasty, which used to observe the movements of celestial bodies, is about nine meters high.

    It is known as the oldest observatory in the East, which was built during the reign of Queen Seondeok, and is a valuable cultural asset that shows the high level of science of the time.

    It was designated as National Treasure No. 31 on December 20, 1962.

Special (0)

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