Search Result > Little Korea

SEARCH CONTENT

Search for content in Little Korea

Search Keyword : Cultural heritage

K-Pop & Trot (0)

no data

K-Traditional Music (8)

  • 2020.12.1
    Recommended music
    Jongmyo Jerye is a festive ritual in which the king wishes the nation and the people to be peaceful with the help of heaven and earth, and Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to instrumental music, songs and dances performed to hold a solemn ceremony for Jongmyo Jerye.

    Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak were designated as Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 56 and No. 1, and were preserved and handed down as UNESCO Intangible Cultural heritage of Humanity on May 18, 2001.
  • 2020.12.11
    Recommended music
    Jongmyo Jerye is a festive ritual in which the king wishes the nation and the people to be peaceful with the help of heaven and earth, and Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to instrumental music, songs and dances performed to hold a solemn ceremony for Jongmyo Jerye.

    Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak were designated as Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 56 and No. 1, and were preserved and handed down as UNESCO Intangible Cultural heritage of Humanity on May 18, 2001.
  • 2020.12.16
    Recommended music
    It is a creative song that sings about our proud and splendid Cultural heritage and beautiful scenery of Korea.

    The warmth and soul of the Korean people are wrapped in the wind as if they were passing by the name of their names, shaking off all kinds of thoughts and shaking off all kinds of thoughts.

K-Cultural Heritage (743)

  • 1986.11.9
    designated date
    Jisung Craft is also known as Nojikkae, which is made by twisting paper into a container. Although the exact date of the outbreak is unknown, it is estimated that there were many paper bowls during the Joseon Dynasty, which had been handed down since then.

    Cut Korean paper and soak it in water to make it. Fold the twisted paper string in half and weave it one by one. A pattern or shape can be freely changed and a pattern is applied to a paper bowl with a form. Finally, it is finished by polishing with cashew, a kind of paint. They make baskets, trays, suspenders, shoes (meturi) with paper straps.

    Jiseungjo was designated as an intangible Cultural asset in order to transfer and protect technology as a traditional craftsmanship. It has been cut off for some time by Choi Young-joon, a functional holder living in Hongseong-gun, Chungcheongnam-do.
  • 1969.11.10
    designated date
    The Korean traditional music is composed of sijo poems (Korean traditional poetry) and sung to orchestral accompaniment. It is also known as 'Sakdaeyeop' or 'Song'.

    The original version of the song is Mandaeyeop, Jung Daeyeop, and Sakdaeyeop, but the slow song, Mandaeyeop, disappeared before the reign of King Yeongjo (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1676), which was not sung at the end of the Joseon Dynasty.

    The current song is derived from the "Sakdaeyeop," a fast song that appeared since the late Joseon Dynasty, and various rhythmical related songs have formed a five-piece collection of songs.

    Currently, 41 songs are handed down, including the Ujo and the Gyemyeonjo, 26 male and 15 female songs, but the female versions of the male and female songs are slightly modified so that women can sing the male and female songs, which are almost identical to the male chant. However, there is a difference between the melody that shows the delicacy of the female singer and the low-pitched voice.

    According to the format, a poem is divided into five chapters, and the prelude, a rental note, and a second, three, three, four, and five chapters are repeated. The highly organized and well-organized performance consists of geomungo, gayageum, haegeum, daegeum, danso, and janggu.

    Songs have been in existence for many years without change, and are of high artistic value that have been handed down by experts compared to other music being popular.
  • 1992.11.10
    designated date
    Soban is a small table of dishes that is used for various purposes from Korean diet to ritual ceremonies. The art of making soban or its craftsman is called sobanjang.

    Various types of tomb murals such as the Gakjeochong Tomb and the Dance Tomb of Goguryeo were found in various types of tomb murals. Records such as "Samguk Sagi," "Byeolsa" and "Gyeongguk Daejeon" indicate that the state-affiliated organizations were divided into two groups to produce the paintings. During the Joseon Dynasty, Buddhist statues were mainly used rather than statues due to the influence of Confucian ideology, and small and large statues were needed for various purposes such as rituals and weddings, which naturally led to the development of small and medium-sized soban production.

    The type of soban is classified into about 60 types depending on the area, type, and use of the soban. Haeju-ban, Naju-ban, Tongyeong-ban, Chungju-ban, and Gangwon-do. Haeju-ban is a sculpture-oriented soban, Naju-ban is a medium-sized soban, and Tongyeong-based soban is a rhyme-oriented one. In addition, in terms of bridge shape, Jukjeol-type (bamboo-shaped), Hojok-type (tiger-shaped), and Gujok-type (dog-shaped) in Gangwon-do and Gyeonggi-do are the main features.

K-History (9)

  • 1962.12.20
    designated date of national treasure
    The construction of Seokguram Grotto was begun in 751 under the leadership of Prime Minister Kim Dae-seong during the reign of King Gyeongdeok of the Silla Dynasty, and was completed in 774 (the 10th year of King Hyegong’s reign), whereupon it was given its original name of Seokbulsa Temple.
    Buddhist art reached its peak during King Gyeongdeok’s reign, which spanned the middle period of the Silla Period, Besides Seokguram Grotto, many other Cultural treasures were built during this period, including Bulguksa Temple, Dabotap Pagoda, the Three-story Stone Pagoda of Bulguksa Temple, and the Bell of Hwangnyongsa Temple.
    The artificial stone grotto was built halfway down Tohamsan Mountain with pieces of white granite. The principal statue of Sakyamuni Buddha was placed at the center of the grotto, and forty statues of various bodhisattvas, Buddha’s disciples, and guardian kings were carved on the surrounding walls, though only thirty-eight of them remain. The rectangular front chamber of the grotto is connected to the round main chamber by a corridor. The exquisite ceiling of the main chamber was made with more than 360 flat stones. The architectural technique used to build this grotto is unprecedented in its excellence. There are statues of four guardian deities on both the left and right sides of the front chamber, which functions as the entrance to the main chamber. Carved on both sides of the entrance to the corridor is a statue of the Vajra Guardians, while the narrow corridor is decorated with the Four Guardian Kings carved in pairs. There is an octagonal stone column on both sides of the entrance to the round main chamber. The Principal Buddha is placed slightly off center toward the back of the main chamber. From the entrance, the walls of the chamber are filled with the images of two devas, two bodhisattvas, and ten arhats. Standing behind the Principal Buddha is a statue of the Eleven-faced Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva, perhaps the most exquisitely carved statue found inside this grotto.
    Every single sculpture contained in the grotto may be considered a masterpiece of East Asian Buddhist art. The list of masterpieces includes the principal image of Buddha, which was created with mature carving skills; the Eleven-faced Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva with its magnificently carved face and body; statues of valiant warriors and the majestic Four Guardian Kings; and the supple graceful statues of various bodhisattvas and arhats, each of which displays a distinctive individuality. In particular, the serene appearance of the Principal Buddha enshrined in the main chamber deepens the mystical atmosphere. The extremely natural appearance of the Principal Buddha seems to present to all living people the ideal model of a man harboring a profound and sublime mind deep within him and easily pass to them his everlasting mercy. Seokguram Grotto is a masterpiece of the golden age of Buddhist art in Silla. What makes it stand out all the more is its perfect combination of architecture, mathematics, geometry, religion, and art. Seokguram Grotto has long been preserved as National Treasure No. 24, and was jointly registered as a UNESCO World heritage in December 1995 along with Bulguksa Temple.
  • 1962.12.20
    designated date of national treasure
    Dabotap Pagoda and Seokgatap Pagoda (the Three-story Stone Pagoda of Bulguksa Temple, National Treasure No. 21) are the two most renowned pagodas in Korea. They are similar in height (10.29m and 10.75m), and stand facing each other, Dabotap Pagoda in the east, Seokgatap Pagoda in the west, between Daeungjeon Hall and Jahamun Gate of Bulguksa Temple . Dabotap is a unique type of pagoda, while Seokgatap Pagoda (also known as “Sakyamuni Buddha Pagoda”) is representative of the more general type of stone pagoda. The two pagodas were built at the same site to reflect the content of the Saddharmapundarika Sutra (The Lotus Sutra), in which the Dabo Buddha (“Buddha of the past”) stands beside Sakyamuni (“Buddha of the present”) to prove that his Buddhist sermon is right. Bulguksa Temple was founded by Kim Dae-seong’s offer in 751 (the 10th year of the reign of King Gyeongdeok of Silla).
    Samguk yusa (Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms) states that Kim Dae-seong built Seokguram Grotto for his parents in his former life, and Bulguksa Temple for his present parents. However, the temple was not completed at the time of his death, so it was finished afterwards by the kingdom, and in the end, the temple was run not for the private individual Kim Dae-seong but for the benefit of the kingdom as a whole.
    Bulguksa Temple can be said to be the realization of the Buddhist paradise in which Buddhist monks of past, present, and future live together. It clearly reveals aspects of the spiritual world of the people of Silla. While it is perfectly clear that Seokgatap Pagoda is a three-story pagoda standing on a two-story platform, it is difficult to count the number of stories of Dabotap Pagoda. In fact, even experts have diverging opinions, with some saying it is has four stories and others that it has only three. However, the uniqueness of Dabotap Pagoda can be seen in the structure of each part. Stone staircases are attached to each side of the cross-shaped platform, with an octagonal pagoda body surrounded by square railings placed upon it. It is presumed that the pagoda was built in 751 during the construction of Bulguksa Temple.
    This work is a masterpiece that beautifully expresses the complicated structure of wooden construction without any distraction by the use of through novel ideas. The work exhibits the artistic sensibility of Unified Silla through its well-organized structure consisting of squares, octagons, and circles, and in its length, width and thickness, which are standardized in every part. During the Japanese Colonial Period, the Japanese dismantled and repaired the pagoda around 1925, but they left behind no records of this work. In the process, Artifact, reliquaries, and other artifacts that must have been placed inside the pagoda all disappeared. In addition, of the four lions originally placed on the stone staircases of the pagoda, the Japanese took away three, all of which must have been in good condition. Though there have been continuous efforts to retrieve these precious Cultural heritages, no trace has been found of them as yet.
  • 2020.1.1
    the day of sacrificial rites
    Jongmyo Shrine, located in Jongno-gu, Seoul, is where the ancestral tablets of kings and queens of the Joseon Dynasty were held.

    It is a Cultural heritage that shows the royal ritual culture, a Confucian tradition of the Joseon Dynasty, and the spatial planning method is very unique and in excellent state of preservation.

    It was built and maintained in the late 14th century, but was destroyed during the Japanese Invasion of Korea in the early 17th century, and was later added to the current state as needed.

    Jongmyo Shrine is also a World heritage Site, but Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak, which are held in Jongmyo Shrine, are also registered as intangible assets.

Special (0)

no data