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K-Traditional Music (4)

  • 2021.2.10
    Recommended music
    A turtle, who went up to the land to find the liver of a rabbit called a special medicine to the Dragon King, who was sick due to environmental pollution, brought the rabbit to the Dragon Palace, lying that he would give the rabbit a training captain.☆
  • 2021.5.16
    Recommended music
    Choi Jun - The founder of Pansori Byeongchang, overcame the development disorder (automatic lung) with pansori and sang Heungboga in front of 700 audiences at the National Gugak Center in the sixth grade of elementary school. Since then, he has been participating in various performances and private presentations.

    Composed by Choi Jun, 'Dongnampung Bide' expresses the earnest heart and solemnity of Jegal Gongmyeong's piano performance in the hope of the southeast wind blowing during the JeokbyeokDaejeon.
  • 2021.5.26
    Recommended music
    Choi Jun - The founder of Pansori Byeongchang, overcame the development disorder (automatic lung) with pansori and sang Heungboga in front of 700 audiences at the National Gugak Center in the sixth grade of elementary school. Since then, he has been participating in various performances and private presentations.

    The sound of Jojo's defeat in the JeokbyeokDaejeon and fleeing to Orimnung is described as the sound of a sad bird in which Jojo's soldiers became the birds of origin and grieve in the mountains of the cold winter, blaming Jojo for driving them to death.

K-Cultural Heritage (39)

  • 1992.11.10
    designated date
    Soban is a small table of dishes that is used for various purposes from Korean diet to ritual ceremonies. The art of making soban or its craftsman is called sobanjang.

    Various types of tomb murals such as the Gakjeochong Tomb and the Dance Tomb of Goguryeo were found in various types of tomb murals. Records such as "Samguk Sagi," "Byeolsa" and "Gyeongguk Daejeon" indicate that the state-affiliated organizations were divided into two groups to produce the paintings. During the Joseon Dynasty, Buddhist statues were mainly used rather than statues due to the influence of Confucian ideology, and small and large statues were needed for various purposes such as rituals and weddings, which naturally led to the development of small and medium-sized soban production.

    The type of soban is classified into about 60 types depending on the area, type, and use of the soban. Haeju-ban, Naju-ban, Tongyeong-ban, Chungju-ban, and Gangwon-do. Haeju-ban is a sculpture-oriented soban, Naju-ban is a medium-sized soban, and Tongyeong-based soban is a rhyme-oriented one. In addition, in terms of bridge shape, Jukjeol-type (bamboo-shaped), Hojok-type (tiger-shaped), and Gujok-type (dog-shaped) in Gangwon-do and Gyeonggi-do are the main features.
  • 2002.11.25
    designated date
    Onggi is a general term for earthenware and earthenware, and onggi is a pottery that does not have a glaze, and onggi is a pottery that is made of glaze, which corresponds to a narrow meaning.

    Unglazed pottery was the main focus until the Goryeo Dynasty, but from the mid-Joseon Dynasty, black-brown pottery with onggi was produced, and glazed pottery became common in the late Joseon Dynasty.

    Records show that large earthenware jars, called "Ong," were used to store or store liquids or foods such as alcohol, water, soy sauce, and salted fish before the Goryeo Dynasty. It was recently discovered that large quantities of pottery jars excavated from the Taean Mado Sea were used to store water or transport salted fish.

    During the Joseon Dynasty, pottery craftsmen were referred to as "gongjang." According to the "GyeonggukDaejeon" exhibition factory, 104 of them belonged to 14 central government offices and produced pottery needed by the royal family and government offices.

    Pottery, including onggi, was used in a wide class from the royal family to the private sector and developed with regional characteristics in relation to climate or use.

    Kim Il-man, who was designated as an intangible cultural asset in Gyeonggi Province in 2002, is from a family that has been making pottery for six generations and has devoted himself to making traditional pottery in Gyeonggi Province using three traditional kilns from the late Joseon Dynasty.

    In 2010, he was promoted to the state-designated Important Intangible Cultural Property No. 96, and his sons, Kim Seong-ho and Kim Yong-ho, were designated as messengers, continuing the tradition of Onggi production in Gyeonggi Province.
  • 1986.12.11
    designated date
    A gong is one of the percussion instruments, also called gilt or simply gold. It is a musical instrument widely used since ancient China. It was imported from the Ming Dynasty of China during the reign of King Gongmin of Goryeo (1351-1374), and was widely used in Jongmyoak, Muak, Beopak and Nongak.

    The gongs are made by melting them in a weight ratio of 160 copper and 43 cinnamon, and are produced in a group by Daejeong, GajiDaejeong, a front hawker, a reseller, a Senmae, and a puller.

    The production process is the order of brass rusting, elongating, dopping, potting, wrapping, dangling, crying, Gaji, and Jaewool, which is a sensitive work that makes a completely different sound with a hammering.

    Jing's life is in sound. Depending on the region, there are many different sounds, such as the buzzing, the bending, the long ringing, and the rising sound of the sound of the end. The sound of a proper gong has a deep and long afterglow and deep appeal, and this is what Kim Chun-jing's sound is characterized by.

    Kim Il-woong, a holder of jingjiang functions, has been continuing Kim Chun-jing's cycle for more than 40 years by setting up a farm instrument factory in Gimcheon's Hwanggeum-dong drug bet after learning the technique under his grandfather, who has been making gongs in Hamyang for four generations.

K-History (5)

  • 1987.12.3
    open unification
    Jungbu Expressway (part of Express National Road No. 35) is a highway in South Korea that connects the two Koreas, starting from Cheongju, North Chungcheong Province, and Hanam, Gyeonggi Province.

    Although the same route number is given as Tongyeong Daejeon Expressway, it is a different route legally and institutionally.

    It was opened on December 3, 1987 to disperse traffic on the Gyeongbu Expressway and promote regional development.
  • 1968.4.1
    Organization day
    The Reserve Day was established by the Ministry of National Defense in order to renew its commitment to protect the homeland with all the Republic of Korea's reserve forces are organized by the Ministry of National Defense.

    When the January 21st incident occurred in 1968, the founding ceremony of the Local Reserve Army was held at Daejeon Public Stadium on April 1 of that year, and the 'Local Reserve Army Day' ceremony was held every year on the first Saturday of April from 1970.
  • 1955.4.18
    Date of hosting
    The Baekje Cultural Festival originated in 1955 when Buyeo-gun residents established an altar in Buyeo Mountain Fortress and offered a memorial service to the Three loyalist of Baekje.

    It has been held simultaneously in Daejeon, Gongju, and Buyeo since the 20th anniversary of 1974, and has been held in Gongju for one year after the decision of the Baekje Cultural Festival Improvement Committee in 1979.

    This local festival is organized by Buyeo-gun or Gongju-si and organized by the Baekje Cultural Promotion Committee to have the characteristics of traditional cultural festivals.​

    More than 60 events will be held as major events, including the National Sijo Gyeongchang Contest, the Palace Contest, the Fireworks Festival, traditional folk performances, Baekje history and culture experiences, and academic seminars.

    In particular, King Munju's Ungjinseong's Cheondo Ceremony and the disguise parade of Baekje Culture, where more than 5,000 people participate, is a central event that reproduces and inherits Baekje culture.​

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