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K-Traditional Music (7)

  • 2020.11.9
    Recommended music
    It means "preventing the bad luck of the house," and it is a song that prevents bad luck and blesses you.

    Gayageum Byeongchang: Jeon Hai-ok, Oh Ju-eun, Choi Ye-rim
    Ajaeng: Seo Young-ho
    Daegeum: Won Wan Chul
    Ko Soo: Jung Joon Ho
  • 2020.11.15
    Recommended music
    Gyeongsang Province, late Kim So-hee song made by the singer features an enchanting melody, and the Japanese occupation of the menarijo bukkando lost wind-swept heart of people who moved to country representation.A folk song(Minyo).

    Gayageum Byeongchang: Jeon Hai-ok, Oh Ju-eun, Choi Ye-rim
    Ajaeng: Seo Young-ho
    Daegeum: Won Wan Chul
    Ko Soo: Jung Joon Ho
  • 2021.2.9
    Recommended music
    [Sorihyeon Gayageum Byeongchang]

    Gayageum Byeongchang(singing while playing)-dan consisting of graduates from Chung-Ang University's College of Arts.

    Park Hye-ryeon, Kim Young-ah, Kim Ji-ae, Kim Ji-sung, Kim Min-jae, Lee Ji-young, Kim Yeon-ji, Lee☆

K-Cultural Heritage (7)

  • 1991.11.23
    designated date
    Gayageum Byeongchang refers to singing while riding Gayageum.

    The song is sung by adding Gayageum accompaniment while picking a passage from either Danga or Pansori. In Pansori, it is also called Seokhwaje. There is a theory that Kim Changjo, the master of the Gaya Geumsanjo, began to be called in the late Joseon Dynasty.

    Jinyang, Jungmori, Jungjungmori, and Jajinmori are used in Jangdan. The same melody of the Gayageum and the song changes to match the principle of the Gayageum, fills the space of the song with the Gayageum melody, and sometimes adds to the excitement by adding the Gayageum ganju.

    Some of the representative songs include Gokcho, Honam, Cheongseoknyeong Pass, Jukjangmanghye, Saranga among Chunhyangga, Jebinojeonggi among Heungbo, and Gogo riverside among Sugungga.

    Gayageum Byeongchang is a valuable cultural asset that seeks pure musical beauty among traditional music.
  • 1968.12.21
    designated date
    Sanjo refers to the playing of an instrument solo to the accompaniment of janggo (hourglass-shaped drum), moving from slow to fast rhythm, in four to six movements. Gayageum Sanjo is Korean instrumental folk music played solo with Gayageum (twelve-stringed zither). Gayageum Byeongchang refers to the singing and playing of Gayageum at the same time. All Sanjo start with slow rhythm and gradually changes to faster rhythm, making listeners feel tense and increasingly delighted. Gayamgeum Sanjo is made up of four to six rhythms: jinyangjo (slow), jungmori (moderate), jungjungmori (moderately fast), jajinmori (fast), and hwimori (fastest). Compared to other instrument-based Sanjo, Gayageum Sanjo masters could form diverse schools thanks to the unique characteristics of Gayageum. A singer engaging in Gayageum Byeongchang sings a part of danga or pansori to the accompaniment of his/her own Gayageum playing. Gayageum Byeongchang used to be sung by Gayageum Sanjo masters, but the current tendency is for the separation between players of Sanjo and Byeongchang. A song sung as Byeongchang creates its own atmosphere due to the unique melody of Gayageum. The following are well-known parts of Gayageum Byeongchang: Jebinojeonggi (Route of the Swallow's Trip) of Pansori Heungboga (Song of Heungbo), Sarangga (Song of Love) of Chunhyangga (Song of Chunhyang), Gogocheonbyeon (Brightness of the Sunshine in the Sky) of Sugungga (Song of the Rabbit and the Turtle), and “Sim Cheong’s Father on His Way to Hwangseong” of Simcheongga (Song of Sim Cheong).
  • 2005.3.3
    designated date
    Gayageum Byeongchang refers to the form of a performance in which some parts of folk songs, dan-ga, and pansori are sung while playing the Gayageum.

    Popular songs are along with folk songs such as Saetaryeong and Namwonsanseong Fortress; dan-gas include "Honamga," "Jukjangmanghye," "Recording Bangcho," and "Gongmyeongga;" among pansori "Saranga," from Chunhyangga, "Jebinnojeonggi" from Heungboga, "Gogocheobyeon" from Sugungga, etc.

    Janggu accompanies with rhythms such as Jinyangjo, Jungmori, Jungjungmori, and Jajinmori, which are based on the basic rhythm of pansori, and sometimes accompanied by Buk, which gives a boost .

K-History (0)

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