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K-Traditional Music (1)

  • 2021.1.29
    Recommended music
    ♡ It is one of the folk songs of Seoul and Gyeonggi Province. It was sung during the reconstruction of Gyeongbokgung Palace at the end of the Joseon Dynasty

    ○ Folk songs/Lee Eun-hye, Kim Se-yoon, Park Min-ju
    ○ Flute/Park Ji-won, Daegeum/Ohgyo-seon, Haegeum/Hwang Han-na, Ajaeng/Jin Min-jin, Gayageum/Hasora, Geomungo/Park Hye-shin, Janggu/Gang Jeong-yong

K-Cultural Heritage (2)

  • 2002.11.25
    designated date
    The carpenter, who is a craftsman dealing with wood, is divided into a ranch that builds Palaces, temples, or houses, as well as a small ranch that makes furniture, such as a wardrobe, door-gaps, tables, and soban, and other wooden crafts. Building wood refers to the manufacture of small facilities attached to buildings, such as windows, handrails, and closures.

    Currently designated as an intangible cultural asset in Gyeonggi Province, Kim Soon-ki is a small ranch specializing in traditional windows and doors. He uses red pine or yuksong when he can't find the spruce fruit, Chumok or Choonhyangmok. The windows he produced include the Wanja Changshi, the Three-Year-Old Gate, the Rainbow Gate, and the Flower Salmun.

    To make a flower pattern complete with the best floral print among the windows, several pieces must be cut and combined. Instead of simply cutting and attaching them according to the shape, they make and combine the doorknob in a way that crosses the bite.

    He participated in the restoration of Confucian schools, such as Gyeongbokgung Palace, Suwonhyanggyo Local Confucian School, and Hongcheonhyanggyo Local Confucian School, as well as temples and shrines, and produced windows and doors of Seojangdae and Hwahongmun in the Hwaseong Restoration Project.
  • 2000.10.19
    designated date
    Sajikdaeje is a national rite given to the god of land and grain, while Sajik means the god of land, and Jik means the god of grain. In ancient times, when a country was established, a ritual was held to pray for the people to live comfortably in the land and grain gods. The memorial service for the resignation, which has been held since the Three Kingdoms Period, offers a glimpse into our ancestors' gratitude for nature.

    King Taejo of the Joseon Dynasty established Jongmyo Shrine and Sajikdan Altar (Historic Site No. 121) along with the royal Palace to set up Jongmyo Shrine on the east side of Gyeongbokgung Palace, Sajikdan Altar on the west, and Sajikdan Altar in each province to pray for the comfort and good harvest of the people. Sajikdan has assigned divisions (Taesasin and Futosin) and direct divisions (Tajiksin and Hujiksin) to the east and west). The ancestral tablets of Taiji and Taijik face north to the south of the Dansang, the huto god to the left of the Taoist god, and the latter to the left of Taijiksin.

    Usually, ancestral rites were held in February and August, and a rain ritual was held in the event of a major national crisis or drought. The procedures and formalities for holding ancestral rites have changed little by little over time, but gradually we moved away from the stage of imitating the Chinese ways and had our own examples. Various kinds of grain including raw meat of cattle, pigs, and sheep are prepared today, and the rituals are held in the order of spirits, emperors, jinchan, choheonrye, aheonrye, Jongheonrye, Eokbokrye, Cheolbyeondu, Songsin, and Mangye (Mangye).

    The music, dance, food, clothing, and rituals used in Sajikje, as well as our own ritual procedures for holding rituals, help us understand traditional culture. In 1894 (the 31st year of King Gojong's reign), the system was changed to the new government system, and was abolished by Japan's coercion in the 2nd year of King Sunjong's reign (1908). Since then, it was restored in October 1988 through the testimony of the late Yi Eun-pyo, who was the holder of the Jongmyo Jeryeondae. Currently, the Sajik Daejebongsa Committee, located within the Jeonju Yi Clan, preserves and inherits the Sajik Daeje.

K-History (6)

  • 1962.12.20
    designated date of national treasure
    Purebi of Silla Jinheungwang in Bukhansan Mountain in Seoul was erected after King Jinheung of Silla visited the newly targeted border area.

    Although it was located at Bukhansan Mountain Bibong, it was moved to Gyeongbokgung Palace for preservation, and has been housed by the National Museum of Korea since 1970.

    On December 20, 1962, it was designated as National Treasure No. 3 of the Republic of Korea.
  • 1963.1.18
    designated date
    Changdeokgung Palace was the second royal villa built following the construction of Gyeongbokgung Palace in 1405. It was the principal Palace for many kings of the Joseon dynasty, and is the most well-preserved of the five remaining royal Joseon Palaces. The Palace grounds are comprised of a public Palace area, a royal family residence building, and the rear garden. Known as a place of rest for the kings, the rear garden boasts a gigantic tree that is over 300 years old, a small pond and a pavilion.

    The Palace gained importance starting from the time of Seongjong, the 9th king of Joseon, when a number of kings began using it as a place of residence. Unfortunately, the Palace was burned down by angry citizens in 1592 when the royal family fled their abode during the Japanese invasion of Korea. Thanks to Gwanghaegun, the Palace was restored in 1611. Even today, it houses a number of cultural treasures, such as Injeongjeon Hall, Daejojeon Hall, Seonjeongjeon Hall, and Nakseonjae Hall.

    Changdeokgung Palace’s garden behind the inner hall, called the Secret Garden, was constructed during the reign of King Taejong and served as a resting place for the royal family members. The garden had formerly been called Bugwon and Geumwon, but was renamed Biwon Garden after King Gojong came into power. The garden was kept as natural as possible and was touched by human hands only when absolutely necessary. Buyongjeong Pavilion, Buyongji Pond, Juhamnu Pavilion, Eosumun Gate, Yeonghwadang Hall, Bullomun Gate, Aeryeonjeong Pavilion, and Yeongyeongdang Hall are some of the many attractions that occupy the garden. The most beautiful time to see the garden is during the fall when the autumn foliage is at its peak and the leaves have just started to fall.

    Though it has been treasured by Koreans for centuries, Changdeokgung Palace was recognized as a World Cultural Heritage site by the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Committee in December of 1997 during the committee meeting in Naples, Italy.
  • 1963.1.18
    designated date
    Deoksugung Palace is unique among Korean Palaces in having a modern seal engraving and a western style garden and fountain. Medieval and modern style architecture exists together in harmony in Deoksugung Palace. The Changing of the Royal Guard can be seen in front of Daehanmun (Gate) and is a very popular event for many visitors. During the Joseon Dynasty, the royal guard was responsible for opening and closing the Palace gate as well as patrolling around the gate area. Outside the Palace is a picturesque road flanked by a stone wall which is much loved by visitors.

    Originally, Deoksugung Palace was not a Palace. The Imjin War (the Japanese invasions in 1592) left all the Palaces in Korea severely damaged. When King Seonjo (the fourteenth king of the Joseon Dynasty) returned to Seoul from his evacuation, the primary Palace Gyeongbokgung Palace had been burnt to the ground and other Palaces were also heavily damaged. A temporary Palace was chosen from among the houses of the royal family. This is the origin of Deoksugung Palace. King Gwanghaegun (the fifteenth king of the Joseon Dynasty) named the Palace Gyeongungung, formalizing it as a royal Palace. Since then it has been used as an auxiliary Palace by many Joseon kings. In 1897, Emperor Gojong (the twenty-sixth king of the Joseon Dynasty) stayed here and expanded it. The modern buildings such as Seokjojeon (Hall) were constructed during this period. In 1907, the Palace was renamed Deoksugung.

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