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  • 1963.1.18
    designated date
    Deoksugung Palace is unique among Korean palaces in having a modern seal engraving and a western style garden and fountain. Medieval and modern style architecture exists together in harmony in Deoksugung Palace. The Changing of the Royal Guard can be seen in front of Daehanmun (Gate) and is a very popular event for many visitors. During the Joseon Dynasty, the royal guard was responsible for opening and closing the palace gate as well as patrolling around the gate area. Outside the palace is a picturesque road flanked by a stone wall which is much loved by visitors.

    Originally, Deoksugung Palace was not a palace. The Imjin War (the Japanese Invasions in 1592) left all the palaces in Korea severely damaged. When King Seonjo (the fourteenth king of the Joseon Dynasty) returned to Seoul from his evacuation, the primary palace Gyeongbokgung Palace had been burnt to the ground and other palaces were also heavily damaged. A temporary palace was chosen from among the houses of the royal family. This is the origin of Deoksugung Palace. King Gwanghaegun (the fifteenth king of the Joseon Dynasty) named the palace Gyeongungung, formalizing it as a royal palace. Since then it has been used as an auxiliary palace by many Joseon kings. In 1897, Emperor Gojong (the twenty-sixth king of the Joseon Dynasty) stayed here and expanded it. The modern buildings such as Seokjojeon (Hall) were constructed during this period. In 1907, the palace was renamed Deoksugung.
  • 1592.5.23
    the date of the outbreak
    The Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592, from May 23, 1592 to December 16, 1598, was a war between Joseon and Ming China versus Japan.

    It was an international war that shook the history of East Asia in the 16th and 17th centuries, with tremendous influence not only on Joseon but also Ming and Japan, which were the main stages of the war.

    From the Japanese perspective, although the original purpose of 'conquering Joseon and entering the continent' was not achieved, it also gained cultural benefits such as pottery manufacturing techniques, looting metal types, and inflow of Neo-Confucianism by looting various human and material resources from Joseon.

    It also re-emerged as a major player in the international situation in East Asia a thousand years after the Battle of the Baekgang River in the 7th century. The beginning of the fall of the Ming Dynasty, which had reigned as an absolute hegemonic power in East Asia, was also foreign exchange, including the Japanese Invasion of Korea in 1592.

    It is no exaggeration to say that the Korean peninsula was devastated by the war.

    There are many legends about Yi Sun-sin, who is revered as a sacred hero, as well as about various righteous army generals throughout the country, and it is still being handed down to this day.

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