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K-Pop & Trot (6)

  • 2020.12.19
    Broadcasting day
    ☆ Singer Kim Ji-ae made her name known in 1986 when Park Chun-seok's original trot "Muleya," composed of lyrics and lyrics, became a hit.

    In 1989, the song "The Ugly Person" (composed by Jeon Young-rok) rose to stardom with the highest popularity upon its release.

    In December 2020, 'Lee So-na', a Korean Traditional Musician who majored in Gyeonggi folk Music, received great attention for singing at ' KBS Broadcasting Station (Trot National Contest). ☆
  • 1985.3.15
    release date
    ♡ The title track of the first album, "Rainy Yeongdonggyo," received the Rookie of the Year award for the first time with a good response from the public, but I thought the singer's path would not last long.

    Contrary to expectations, however, "The Burse of Tears" (Jeong Eun-yi/South Korean/Kim Yong-nyeon) and "The Person in Shinsadong" (Jeong Eun-yi/South Korean/Kim Yong-nyeon) became a hit series in 1986 and became a Traditional trot singer by winning the top 10 and best singer awards.

    In the 1980s, Hanbal De Na-ah became a female singer representing the Korean Music industry and was called the Big Three in the female trot world with Kim Soo-hee and Shim Soo-bong, performing and participating in producing various albums.
  • 1983.8.15
    release date
    [1992 Concert Video]

    Kim Soo-chul's "Byul-ri," which is reminiscent of a tune from a pansori, is considered a masterpiece of his first album released in 1983, along with "A Flower that Didn't bloom."

    The song is quite different from "The Seven-Colored Rainbow," which was sung in the group's small giant days.

    It can be seen as a Korean Traditional Musician born after his attempt to incorporate Korean sentiment into rock Music.

K-Traditional Music (78)

  • 2020.11.10
    Recommended music
    ♡ Take a flash animation of the beautiful creative Korean Traditional Music that will warm your children's emotions.
  • 2020.11.17
    Recommended music
    Park Yong-tae (present name: Park Dae-sung) is a first-generation apprentice to Han Il-seop, the founder of the Ajaeng Sanjo, and the legitimacy of the Korean Traditional Music scene is clear, and there is no doubt about the legitimacy of the melody, and the general Sanjo is composed mainly of the rhythms of Gyemyeonseong Fortress, giving a feeling of pleading and desolation, but Park Yong-tae (Park Dae-tae's Aja's (pyeon's) has a strong sense of superiority.

    Intangible Cultural Property No. 16 designated by Busan Metropolitan City (designated on December 7, 2009)
  • 2020.11.18
    Recommended music
    Pungmul Nori is a folk Music that combines dance and play in the lives of ordinary people.

    You can enjoy various performances such as kkwaenggwari, gong, janggu, drum, and sogo, as well as playing various kinds of games such as spinning sangmo and bona.

K-Cultural Heritage (59)

  • 1969.11.10
    designated date
    The Korean Traditional Music is composed of sijo poems (Korean Traditional poetry) and sung to orchestral accompaniment. It is also known as 'Sakdaeyeop' or 'Song'.

    The original version of the song is Mandaeyeop, Jung Daeyeop, and Sakdaeyeop, but the slow song, Mandaeyeop, disappeared before the reign of King Yeongjo (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1676), which was not sung at the end of the Joseon Dynasty.

    The current song is derived from the "Sakdaeyeop," a fast song that appeared since the late Joseon Dynasty, and various rhythmical related songs have formed a five-piece collection of songs.

    Currently, 41 songs are handed down, including the Ujo and the Gyemyeonjo, 26 male and 15 female songs, but the female versions of the male and female songs are slightly modified so that women can sing the male and female songs, which are almost identical to the male chant. However, there is a difference between the melody that shows the delicacy of the female singer and the low-pitched voice.

    According to the format, a poem is divided into five chapters, and the prelude, a rental note, and a second, three, three, four, and five chapters are repeated. The highly organized and well-organized performance consists of geomungo, gayageum, haegeum, daegeum, danso, and janggu.

    Songs have been in existence for many years without change, and are of high artistic value that have been handed down by experts compared to other Music being popular.
  • 2002.11.15
    designated date
    Pulpis literally mean playing a flute with grass. The Chinese character is also called Chokjeokkeum, which is played by folding leaves or grass leaves and whistling them on the lips. It is said that peaches and citron leaves are used a lot.

    The record of the grass flute is the oldest recorded reed or reed flute in "Suseo" and "Dongdongjeon-dong" and also features a portrait performance in the poem "Someone picks a green leaf from a forest, blows it in his mouth, and makes a clear sound" in the poem "Moon Ga-seong" by Lee Gyu-bo during the Goryeo Dynasty. In 1493, "Akhakwebeom School" compiled by Seonghyeon and others during the reign of King Seongjong of the Joseon Dynasty recorded the types, materials, and methods of performing the full flute in detail. In "The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty," there are several records showing that the court had a Musician playing the initials. In addition, a collection of calligraphic works by various writers showed that they enjoyed playing them from the top to the king to the commoners below. And Kang Choon-seop, a first-time Music expert on meteoric albums, has recorded Music such as "Hwimori" and "Gutgeori" with the same Music as Sanjo. As such, the Pulpieri has been one of the Musical instruments enjoyed by the Korean people throughout its long history, and has been recognized not only by the private sector but also by the official instrument.

    "The Evil Trapezius" records that anyone can play the instrument so easily that it is not difficult to make a sound and play it by saying, "You don't need the teachings of your ancestors, and you can only know all the syllables first." In fact, the full flute is easy for anyone to learn and play, and any Music can be freely played. Today's first play is a folk song, a Cheongseong song, a Sanjo song, and other Traditional pieces of Music.

    In Gyeonggi-do, Oh Se-cheol was designated as the holder of a full flute, and he continues to perform actively.
  • 1996.11.30
    designated date
    Nongyo is a song that is sung to forget fatigue and improve efficiency while working on rice paddies and fields, also called wild songs or farming sounds. As one of the folk songs, the song may be sung individually or collectively and may vary depending on the region.

    Composed Nongyo was greatly developed as humans settled in the Geumgokcheon Stream basin and the agricultural culture developed. The contents are composed of Yongsinje, rice planting, dried radish, Asimaegi, Shilcham, and all kinds of objects. The sound of rice planting, "arralal sangsari," and the sound of non-maggy, "eolka lumps" or "dure sounds," are native sounds in the region.

    Composed Nongyo is a pure Korean melody, and it is a reproduction of the old Nongyo and Dure (an organization for joint work) Choi Yang-seop, an entertainment holder living in Hongseong, continues his career.

K-History (2)

  • 1970.11.19
    Completion date
    Sejong the Great Memorial Hall is a memorial hall located in Cheongnyangri-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, and was built to celebrate the success and achievements of Sejong the Great and to preserve it for a long time.

    The Sejong Daiou Memorial Business Association was laid down on October 9, 1968, completed on November 19, 1970, and opened on October 9, 1973.

    It consists of exhibition rooms such as Sejong the Great's one's life story room, Hangul room, science room, and Korean Traditional Music room.
  • 1978.2.22
    Samulnori's Birthday
    ☆Samulnori means four types of Musical instruments: kkwaenggwari, janggu, buk, and gong.

    Samulnori is an adaptation of a large-scale outdoor Pungmul Nori as a stage art in 1978.

    While pungmul nori emphasized the activity of outdoor performances along with large-scale plays, samulnori is a form of performance that emphasizes the emotion that can be felt in the instrumental sound itself.

    It plays various rhythms and proceeds as a method of development of eccentricity (start, progress, climax, finish) in the periodic flow of tension and relaxation.