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K-Pop & Trot (0)

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K-Cultural Heritage (13)

  • 1980.11.17
    designated date
    Metal decorations, such as locks that reinforce, open and close the joint of wooden furniture, are called jangseok, and craftsmen who make brass (bronze) jangseok, which contains copper and tin, are called duseokjang.

    brass and white bronze are used as materials for feldspars, and white bronze is used to decorate them with more luxurious feldspars. Heat the tin or white bronze in and melt it. Tap it with a hammer to stretch it with 0.5mm thick sheet iron and trim the sides straight.

    Along with the pattern, cut with chisel and chisel, trim it with a string, engrave the pattern with a bow tie and chisel, and rub it with a cloth coated with fraudulent powder to finish it with polish.

    The types of feldspar include farm stones, ark stones, hanging stones, crimson-closing stones, capstone, and traditional feldspar stones, while the patterns include Palbong, Samo, Aja, Aja, Butterfly, Bats, Bungeo, and so on.

    The locks include a cuff, a non-angle, a tortoise-shaped cuff, a tarot and a square-shaped cuff. Because the feldspar alone does not make a single finished product, it was specially made according to the order of the small ranch.
  • 1980.11.17
    designated date
    Byeolsingut refers to a rite to pray to Seonghwang (Seonang), the guardian of the village, every three, five, or ten years for a good harvest of peace and farming in the village.

    About 500 years ago, Hahoe Village in Andong, North Gyeongsang Province, performed a byeolsingut to Emperor Mujinsaeng on the fifteenth day of the New Year (December 15) every 10 years, and played mask games to entertain him along with the exorcism.

    Hahoebyeolsingut Talnori consists of eight madangs of Mudong Madang, Jujumadang, Baekjeong Madang, Halmi Madang, Pagye Seung Madang, Yangban, Seonbi Madang, Honrye Madang, and Sinbang Madang.

    Before the game begins, the day after the beginning of the first lunar month, if you go up to the cathedral, grab the descending pole with the sugar droplets, and lower the Holy Spirit, you move the sugar droplets to the Seonghwangdae and come down from the mountain. If Seonghwangdae and Naerimdae are built against the eaves of a verb, the play begins.

    The characters include Ju Ji-seung, Gaksi, Jung, Yangban, Seonbi, Cho Rang-i, Imae, Bunae, Baekjeong, and Halmi. The book is based on ridicule of Pagye-seung and biting satire and interpretation of the nobleman.

    Hahoe Byeolsingut Talnori has a ritualistic nature. In particular, Gaksital is believed to be a substitute for Seonghwangsin, and only Byeolsingut is to be seen. When taking it out, the ritual must be performed.

    The masks used for the game were made of 11 kinds of 10 types of duckwood, including jija mask, and the original was designated as Hahoe mask and Byeongsan mask (National Treasure No. 121) in 1964 by applying lacquer and pigments in two or three layers.

    The accompaniment of mask play is performed by a pungmul player with a gong-gwaengi at the center, and dance moves with a little bit of dance moves mixed with improvisation and routine movements.

    Hahoe Byeolsingut Talnori is characterized by the lack of a back-to-back party enjoyed by burning masks, and is valuable as a valuable source of information on the origin and origin of mask dramas in Korea.
  • 1964.12.7
    designated date
    Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to music played using dance, songs, and musical instruments when performing ancestral rites (Jongmyo Jerye) at a shrine (Jongmyo) that honors kings and queens of the Joseon Dynasty.

    In each procedure of the Jongmyo rite, a song called Jongmyo movement is sung to praise the virtues of ancestors, focusing on the music of Bo Tae-pyeong and Jeong Dae-up. While the Jongmyo Jeryeak is played, it is accompanied by a literary figure, Bo Taepyeongjimu (honor of the kings' virtues) and a martial artist, Jeong Dae-upjimu (praise of the kings' exploits).

    Jongmyo Jeryeak was originally created for use in the royal banquet in 1447 (the 29th year of King Sejong's reign), and has been handed down to this day after being repaired in accordance with the 10th year of King Sejong's reign (1464). Eleven songs by Bo Tae-pyeong and 11 by Jung Dae-up are played at the Jongmyo Daeje, which is held on the first Sunday of May every year.

    Jongmyo Jeryeak is the essence of court music, which combines instrumental performances, songs and dances of the Joseon Dynasty, and has a unique style and beauty that can not be seen in other countries while well showing our cultural traditions and characteristics.

    The National Intangible Cultural Property No. 1 Jongmyo Jeryeak is currently listed as a representative UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

K-History (1)

  • 1982.1.5
    The date of cancellation of the night curfew
    The curfew, which began on September 8, 1945 under the U.S. Military Government's decree No. 1 and was enforced for 36 years and four months until its abolition on January 5, 1982, was called a total ban on people's passage from midnight every night until 4 a.m. the following day, and was also called curfew and night labor.

    At first, it was only implemented in Seoul and Incheon, but after the Korean War, it expanded nationwide from April 1954 and was banned from night traffic from 10 p.m. to 4 a.m.

    In 1961, curfews were reduced from 12 p.m. to 4 a.m., Jeju in 1964 and Chungbuk in 1965 were excluded from the curfew, but the curfew was maintained until 1982.

Special (0)

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