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K-Traditional Music (6)

  • 2020.12.1
    Recommended music
    Jongmyo Jerye is a festive ritual in which the king wishes the nation and the people to be peaceful with the help of heaven and earth, and Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to instrumental music, songs and dances performed to hold a solemn ceremony for Jongmyo Jerye.

    Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak were designated as Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 56 and No. 1, and were preserved and handed down as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity on May 18, 2001.
  • 2020.12.11
    Recommended music
    Jongmyo Jerye is a festive ritual in which the king wishes the nation and the people to be peaceful with the help of heaven and earth, and Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to instrumental music, songs and dances performed to hold a solemn ceremony for Jongmyo Jerye.

    Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak were designated as Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 56 and No. 1, and were preserved and handed down as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity on May 18, 2001.
  • 2020.12.21
    Recommended music
    Jongmyo Jerye is a festive ritual in which the king wishes the nation and the people to be peaceful with the help of heaven and earth, and Jongmyo Jeryeak refers to instrumental music, songs and dances performed to hold a solemn ceremony for Jongmyo Jerye.

    Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak were designated as Important Intangible Cultural Properties No. 56 and No. 1, and were preserved and handed down as UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity on May 18, 2001.

K-Cultural Heritage (24)

  • 2017.11.15
    designated date
    "Kimchi-making" is a daily and repetitive culture in which the entire Korean people participate as a community beyond regional, social, and economic differences. Kimchi is an indispensable food for Koreans regardless of the region, and it has become one of Korea's representative foods in recognition of its excellence internationally.

    It is an important component of Korean culture for a considerable period of time that contains the spirit of cooperation and sharing, and through this culture, individuals have become united in their relationships with the people, relatives, villages, neighbors, and new communities and have formed their identity.

    "Kimjang," the core of kimchi-making, contains traditional knowledge that nature and humans can live together, and the spirit of sharing, solidarity and harmony that emphasizes to maintain the good of society continues to modern society.

    In the past, if intergenerational transmission was carried out mainly in women's communities such as mothers and daughters-in-law based on accumulated experience and knowledge, Hyundai is becoming an active entity where science is integrated and men participate in kimchi, and schools, private organizations, and local governments are also actively participating in various forms of kimchi culture.

    In addition, the various fermented bacteria in kimchi show biological diversity and local diversity, giving a glimpse of Cultural diversity derived from natural environment.

    Making kimchi did not recognize certain holders or organizations in that it was a lifestyle and culture handed down throughout the country rather than requiring high-level special skills.
  • 1980.11.17
    designated date
    Jeju Chilmeori Dangyeondeunggut is a rite held at Chilmeoridang, the main hall of Geonip-dong, Jeju.

    Geonip-dong is a small fishing village on Jeju Island, where residents held a ritual to pray for the peace and prosperity of the village to the two couples, the city's guardian deities, Dowonsu Inspection and Local Government, and the Yowwanghae Shrine, by catching fish and shellfish or making a living by working as a haenyeo.

    Along with the couple's guardian deity, a ritual was held to honor the deity of Yeongdeungpo, which was held on February 1 from the Oenunbaeki Island or Gangnam Cheonjaguk to enrich the fishermen and haenyeo and return to their home country on February 15.

    Danggut is held on February 1 and February 14 of the lunar calendar every year. On February 1 of the lunar calendar, when Yeongdeungpo god enters, Yeongdeungpo Hwanyeongje is held, and on February 14, the day before he leaves Yeongdeungpo god, Yeongdeungpo Songbyeolje is held.

    Residents believe that the god of Yeongdeungpo receives a bigger farewell than the welcoming ceremony and leaves the next day after receiving a farewell ceremony in Udo, Gujwa-eup. Therefore, during the welcoming ceremony, only the owners of the ship or the religious people gather to perform a simple exorcism, and the farewell ceremony is held all day long, with many fishermen, haenyeo and other religious people gathering.

    On Good Day, fishermen and haenyeo in Jeju City as well as residents of Geonip-dong will participate. And each family prepares food for ancestral rites and brings it to the sugar. Main Simbang performs the exorcism with singing and dancing to the rhythms of musical instruments such as gong, drum, and seolsoe.

    The order of the exorcism rite is to invite all the gods to pray for the good fortune of the families who participated in the rite, to call in the local magistrate of Dowonsu, the local magistrate of the hometown, and Mrs. Yowanghae to pray for the peace of the village, to welcome the dragon and the god of Yeongdeungpo, to the safety of the fishermen and the haenyeo, to the sea again, and to the seeding of the sea.

    Jeju Chilmeori Dangyeondeunggut is a rite containing Jeju Island's unique haenyeo beliefs and folk beliefs about Yeongdeungpo-shin, and has its unique and academic value in that it is the only haenyeo rite in Korea.

    ※ Rename: Jeju Chilmeoridanggut 제주 Jeju Chilmeoridang Yeondeunggut (Changing Date: 2006.6.19).
  • 1985.12.1
    designated date
    Pyeongtaek has long been rich in agriCultural products because it has a wide field called Sosatdeul, which has become an important background for Pyeongtaek Nongak.

    In addition, Cheongnyongsa Temple near Pyeongtaek became the base of Sadangpae early on, and their nongak developed greatly at the end of the Joseon Dynasty. Therefore, Pyeongtaek Nongak is both a dure nongak and a geolippae nongak (the work of the masses playing gong and begging each other).

    The instruments used in nongak include kkwaenggwari, gong, drum, bucku, family register, and trumpet. The formation consists of Yeonggi-su, Nonggi-su, Naepal-su, Hojeok-su, Sangsoe, Buyeo, Sangjang-gu, Sangjang-gu, Sangjang-gu, Bubu, Jongbu, Jongbu-gu, Jongbu, Chilmu-dong, Chilmu-dong, Jungae, and Yangban.

    Nongak players wear costumes worn by military graduates in the past, wear colored bands on top of them, and wear a hat or cone hat on their heads. In terms of musical instruments, the gongs and drums are smaller than other regions, and there is no distinction between Sogo and Beopgo.

    The cover of the melody is clear, and the presence of songgut is also unique. In addition, Gilgunakchilchae is a genre only seen in Gyeonggi Nongak, and Gilgunakchilchae in Pyeongtaek Nongak is distinguished from other regions.

    Pyeongtaek Nongak is a high-quality nongak that is based on the simple tradition of dure nongak, but is composed of a combination of professional performances by namsadangpae entertainers who are highly performing, and Mudong Nori (a child dancing on an adult's wooden horse) was developed in particular.

K-History (5)

  • 1962.12.20
    designated date of national treasure
    The construction of Seokguram Grotto was begun in 751 under the leadership of Prime Minister Kim Dae-seong during the reign of King Gyeongdeok of the Silla Dynasty, and was completed in 774 (the 10th year of King Hyegong’s reign), whereupon it was given its original name of Seokbulsa Temple.
    Buddhist art reached its peak during King Gyeongdeok’s reign, which spanned the middle period of the Silla Period, Besides Seokguram Grotto, many other Cultural treasures were built during this period, including Bulguksa Temple, Dabotap Pagoda, the Three-story Stone Pagoda of Bulguksa Temple, and the Bell of Hwangnyongsa Temple.
    The artificial stone grotto was built halfway down Tohamsan Mountain with pieces of white granite. The principal statue of Sakyamuni Buddha was placed at the center of the grotto, and forty statues of various bodhisattvas, Buddha’s disciples, and guardian kings were carved on the surrounding walls, though only thirty-eight of them remain. The rectangular front chamber of the grotto is connected to the round main chamber by a corridor. The exquisite ceiling of the main chamber was made with more than 360 flat stones. The architectural technique used to build this grotto is unprecedented in its excellence. There are statues of four guardian deities on both the left and right sides of the front chamber, which functions as the entrance to the main chamber. Carved on both sides of the entrance to the corridor is a statue of the Vajra Guardians, while the narrow corridor is decorated with the Four Guardian Kings carved in pairs. There is an octagonal stone column on both sides of the entrance to the round main chamber. The Principal Buddha is placed slightly off center toward the back of the main chamber. From the entrance, the walls of the chamber are filled with the images of two devas, two bodhisattvas, and ten arhats. Standing behind the Principal Buddha is a statue of the Eleven-faced Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva, perhaps the most exquisitely carved statue found inside this grotto.
    Every single sculpture contained in the grotto may be considered a masterpiece of East Asian Buddhist art. The list of masterpieces includes the principal image of Buddha, which was created with mature carving skills; the Eleven-faced Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva with its magnificently carved face and body; statues of valiant warriors and the majestic Four Guardian Kings; and the supple graceful statues of various bodhisattvas and arhats, each of which displays a distinctive individuality. In particular, the serene appearance of the Principal Buddha enshrined in the main chamber deepens the mystical atmosphere. The extremely natural appearance of the Principal Buddha seems to present to all living people the ideal model of a man harboring a profound and sublime mind deep within him and easily pass to them his everlasting mercy. Seokguram Grotto is a masterpiece of the golden age of Buddhist art in Silla. What makes it stand out all the more is its perfect combination of architecture, mathematics, geometry, religion, and art. Seokguram Grotto has long been preserved as National Treasure No. 24, and was jointly registered as a UNESCO World Heritage in December 1995 along with Bulguksa Temple.
  • 2020.1.1
    the day of sacrificial rites
    Jongmyo Shrine, located in Jongno-gu, Seoul, is where the ancestral tablets of kings and queens of the Joseon Dynasty were held.

    It is a Cultural Heritage that shows the royal ritual culture, a Confucian tradition of the Joseon Dynasty, and the spatial planning method is very unique and in excellent state of preservation.

    It was built and maintained in the late 14th century, but was destroyed during the Japanese Invasion of Korea in the early 17th century, and was later added to the current state as needed.

    Jongmyo Shrine is also a World Heritage Site, but Jongmyo Jerye and Jongmyo Jeryeak, which are held in Jongmyo Shrine, are also registered as intangible assets.
  • 1963.1.18
    designated date
    Changdeokgung Palace was the second royal villa built following the construction of Gyeongbokgung Palace in 1405. It was the principal palace for many kings of the Joseon dynasty, and is the most well-preserved of the five remaining royal Joseon palaces. The palace grounds are comprised of a public palace area, a royal family residence building, and the rear garden. Known as a place of rest for the kings, the rear garden boasts a gigantic tree that is over 300 years old, a small pond and a pavilion.

    The palace gained importance starting from the time of Seongjong, the 9th king of Joseon, when a number of kings began using it as a place of residence. Unfortunately, the palace was burned down by angry citizens in 1592 when the royal family fled their abode during the Japanese invasion of Korea. Thanks to Gwanghaegun, the palace was restored in 1611. Even today, it houses a number of Cultural treasures, such as Injeongjeon Hall, Daejojeon Hall, Seonjeongjeon Hall, and Nakseonjae Hall.

    Changdeokgung Palace’s garden behind the inner hall, called the Secret Garden, was constructed during the reign of King Taejong and served as a resting place for the royal family members. The garden had formerly been called Bugwon and Geumwon, but was renamed Biwon Garden after King Gojong came into power. The garden was kept as natural as possible and was touched by human hands only when absolutely necessary. Buyongjeong Pavilion, Buyongji Pond, Juhamnu Pavilion, Eosumun Gate, Yeonghwadang Hall, Bullomun Gate, Aeryeonjeong Pavilion, and Yeongyeongdang Hall are some of the many attractions that occupy the garden. The most beautiful time to see the garden is during the fall when the autumn foliage is at its peak and the leaves have just started to fall.

    Though it has been treasured by Koreans for centuries, Changdeokgung Palace was recognized as a World Cultural Heritage site by the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Committee in December of 1997 during the committee meeting in Naples, Italy.

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