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K-Traditional Music (20)

  • 2020.11.11
    Recommended music
    [Sori Me 6th Regular Concert]

    Ilseungwolhang is a song of the late Joseon Dynasty's annual music.

    Performance: Park Yong-ho, Jeon Myung-shin and Sorime members
  • 2020.11.17
    Recommended music
    Park Yong-tae (present name: Park Dae-sung) is a first-generation apprentice to Han Il-seop, the founder of the Ajaeng Sanjo, and the legitimacy of the Korean traditional music scene is clear, and there is no doubt about the legitimacy of the melody, and the general Sanjo is composed mainly of the rhythms of Gyemyeonseong Fortress, giving a feeling of pleading and desolation, but Park Yong-tae (Park Dae-tae's Aja's (pyeon's) has a strong sense of superiority.

    Intangible cultural property No. 16 designated by Busan Metropolitan City (designated on December 7, 2009)
  • 2020.12.18
    recommended play
    Park Ji Na

    School of Gyeonggi-do Intangible cultural property No. 21 Kim Ki-bok Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori.
    School of Hong Ki-chul, a master of tightrope walking.

K-Cultural Heritage (728)

  • 1986.11.9
    designated date
    Jisung Craft is also known as Nojikkae, which is made by twisting paper into a container. Although the exact date of the outbreak is unknown, it is estimated that there were many paper bowls during the Joseon Dynasty, which had been handed down since then.

    Cut Korean paper and soak it in water to make it. Fold the twisted paper string in half and weave it one by one. A pattern or shape can be freely changed and a pattern is applied to a paper bowl with a form. Finally, it is finished by polishing with cashew, a kind of paint. They make baskets, trays, suspenders, shoes (meturi) with paper straps.

    Jiseungjo was designated as an intangible cultural asset in order to transfer and protect technology as a traditional craftsmanship. It has been cut off for some time by Choi Young-joon, a functional holder living in Hongseong-gun, Chungcheongnam-do.
  • 1969.11.10
    designated date
    The Korean traditional music is composed of sijo poems (Korean traditional poetry) and sung to orchestral accompaniment. It is also known as 'Sakdaeyeop' or 'Song'.

    The original version of the song is Mandaeyeop, Jung Daeyeop, and Sakdaeyeop, but the slow song, Mandaeyeop, disappeared before the reign of King Yeongjo (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1776), and Jungdaeyeop (r. 1724-1676), which was not sung at the end of the Joseon Dynasty.

    The current song is derived from the "Sakdaeyeop," a fast song that appeared since the late Joseon Dynasty, and various rhythmical related songs have formed a five-piece collection of songs.

    Currently, 41 songs are handed down, including the Ujo and the Gyemyeonjo, 26 male and 15 female songs, but the female versions of the male and female songs are slightly modified so that women can sing the male and female songs, which are almost identical to the male chant. However, there is a difference between the melody that shows the delicacy of the female singer and the low-pitched voice.

    According to the format, a poem is divided into five chapters, and the prelude, a rental note, and a second, three, three, four, and five chapters are repeated. The highly organized and well-organized performance consists of geomungo, gayageum, haegeum, daegeum, danso, and janggu.

    Songs have been in existence for many years without change, and are of high artistic value that have been handed down by experts compared to other music being popular.
  • 1992.11.10
    designated date
    Soban is a small table of dishes that is used for various purposes from Korean diet to ritual ceremonies. The art of making soban or its craftsman is called sobanjang.

    Various types of tomb murals such as the Gakjeochong Tomb and the Dance Tomb of Goguryeo were found in various types of tomb murals. Records such as "Samguk Sagi," "Byeolsa" and "Gyeongguk Daejeon" indicate that the state-affiliated organizations were divided into two groups to produce the paintings. During the Joseon Dynasty, Buddhist statues were mainly used rather than statues due to the influence of Confucian ideology, and small and large statues were needed for various purposes such as rituals and weddings, which naturally led to the development of small and medium-sized soban production.

    The type of soban is classified into about 60 types depending on the area, type, and use of the soban. Haeju-ban, Naju-ban, Tongyeong-ban, Chungju-ban, and Gangwon-do. Haeju-ban is a sculpture-oriented soban, Naju-ban is a medium-sized soban, and Tongyeong-based soban is a rhyme-oriented one. In addition, in terms of bridge shape, Jukjeol-type (bamboo-shaped), Hojok-type (tiger-shaped), and Gujok-type (dog-shaped) in Gangwon-do and Gyeonggi-do are the main features.

K-History (2)

  • 1963.1.21
    a date designated as a historical site
    Built in 1395, Gyeongbokgung Palace is also commonly referred to as the Northern Palace because its location is furthest north when compared to the neighboring palaces of Changdeokgung (Eastern Palace) and Gyeonghuigung (Western Palace) Palace. Gyeongbokgung Palace is arguably the most beautiful, and remains the largest of all five palaces.

    The premises were once destroyed by fire during the Imjin War (1592-1598). However, all of the palace buildings were later restored under the leadership of Heungseondaewongun during the reign of King Gojong (1852-1919).

    Remarkably, the most representative edifices of the Joseon dynasty, Gyeonghoeru Pavilion and the pond around Hyangwonjeong Pavillion have remained relatively intact. The raised dias and stone markers of Geunjeongjeon showcase the representative art style of their time.

    The National Palace Museum of Korea is located south of Heungnyemun Gate, and the National Folk Museum is located on the eastern side of Hyangwonjeong Pavillion.
  • 2000.9.10
    designated date
    Daeungjeon Hall of Jogyesa Temple in Seoul is a Joseon-era Daeungjeon Hall located in Gyeonji-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul. On September 10, 2000, it was designated as Tangible cultural property No. 127 of the Seoul Metropolitan Government.

    It is the headquarters of the Jogye Order, which represents Korean Buddhism, and is a place where the Bodhisattva spirit of the great monk who pursues a world where people live together.

    It is also the site of history with the Korean people during the turbulent times of modern and contemporary history, especially the place of national self-reliance that overcame the gloomy era of Japanese colonial rule.

    Jogyesa Temple is the only traditional temple located in the middle of Jongno, the center of Seoul, an international cultural city, where visitors can relax and relax.

    http://www.jogyesa.kr

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