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K-Pop & Trot (1)

  • 1988.2.1
    release date
    ☆Yang Su-kyung is the 'Ballad Queen' representing 8090s.

    She graduated from Seoul Traditional Arts High School and Seoul national University of Arts and appeared on KBS's new singer-discovery program, "The new Stage," in 1987.

    Since 1988, she has worked as a model for commercials and advertisements along with her singing career.

    Starting with the first album 'Leaving Heart', hit songs include 'Love is like rainwater outside the window', 'You're outer', 'You Can't Look' You', 'Where's Love's Cold Temptation', 'Where's the End of the Farewell' and so on.

    It also gained huge popularity in Korea, ranking first in K-pop Top Ten for more than five weeks, and in 1991, it went overseas and won many awards including Japan's NHK Asia's Top Five Star Awards and ABU's Popular Song Festival.

K-Traditional Music (33)

  • 2020.11.16
    Recommended music
    a songwriting appearance/Park In-hye
    dramatization/im Young-wook
    Composer / yuchanmi, Park Geun-hye.
  • 2020.11.25
    Recommended music
    ♡ It is a scene where a housewife avoided a tiger she met on land and finally met a rabbit.

    The member of the national Changgeuk Company, Yu Taepyungyang, will sing along with his teacher, Jo Tong-dal.
  • 2020.12.4
    Recommended dance
    This dance, also known as Sinkal dasinmu, is performed with hanji hanging in both hands at the end of a long bamboo called Sinkal.

    The dance, which is not much now, was passed down from the late Yi Dong-an, who was active in Namsadangpae, and was re-established by Moon Il-ji, and was later re-enacted by Gye Hyeon-sun at the national Folk Gugak Center.

    The abundant movement of the earth, which seems to stay in the air while soothing the soul, is characterized by its graceful, neatness and power as if it were heading to heaven.

    ○ Dance/Gye Hyun-soon, music director/attraction, storytelling/refusal

K-Cultural Heritage (3)

  • 1980.11.17
    designated date
    Yangju Sonori Gut is also known as Sogut, Sogeum Gut, Soeogut, Sonoreum Gut, and Mabutaryeong Gut to pray for family prosperity and good harvests during the Lunar new Year and Ipchun.

    Some say that the origin of Yangju Sowonolgut was derived from Gamaksa Temple, which is regarded as a mountain god in the Yangju area, from a good harvest, from a good harvest, from a good harvest, from a royal rite, and from the entertainment of the rite, but no exact origin was revealed.

    However, it is regarded as a game that originated from Somec Nori, which worships the cows, horses, and the sky, and was played not only in Yangju but also in Seoul, Gyeonggi, Gangwon, Chungcheong, Yellow Sea, and South Pyongan Province.

    The oxenolgut is not performed alone, but is played following the jeseokgeori because it is similar in the nature of farming rituals for cattle and praying for their offspring and longevity.

    At the end of the Jeseok Street, fill a wooden head in front of the jango with beans and stick a dried pollack with a dried pollack to make the sogo stick a stake. Jo-mu, who plays the musician and jango, sits in the yard, and when the gutgeori rhythm rings, Ju-ja, who has white ginseng in her white cone, stands at the end of the floor with a stone fan in her right hand.

    The calf enters first and plays, then heads to the gate to guide the horsemen and cows. Wrap a rubber band with straw to make a head, and with the stone folded in half, five to six people enter and pretend to be cows. A calf plays with a straw mat on its back. The horse-riding one horseman wears a black vest and a navy abalone, a three-shin fan in his right hand and a reins in his left hand.

    The stage of Gut will be moved from the floor to the yard, and the main character will also be changed from shaman to horseman. Gut consists of a conversation between a shaman and a horseman, a horseman's taryeong and words of blessing, a horseman's dance and movement, and a cow's taryeong has a long but sophisticated commoner lyric.

    The sound of oxenolgut starts with (Who's looking for me) (Treasure No Jung-gi) (Taemultaryeong) (Mabu Colonel) (Mabu Colonel) (Cutting the head of a cow) (Cutting oxen) (Teaching oxen) (Taeryeong) (Gullet Tare of cows) (Gulle Tare of cows) (Taryeong))

    Yangjuso Nori Gut is the largest play among other rites, with the lyrics of the rite in a sophisticated commoner style.
  • 1988.8.1
    designated date
    As nongak (farmers’ music) that has been handed down in Pilbong, Imsil, Imsil Pilbong Nongak belongs to Honam Jwado Nongak (Farmers’ Performance of the Western Jeolla-do). Simple farmers’ music such as that performed on occasions like dangsangut (rite to village guardian) or madang bapgi (treading on the courtyard) had been handed down in this village. The music is said to have become sophisticated around 1920 when the villagers started learning the performing skills from Park Hak-sam, who served as sangsoe (leader of a farmers’ music troupe). The members of a farmer’s music troupe wear white jacket and trousers, with blue vest over the jacket and bands in three colors tied to the head. As for the headgear, only the soejabi (gong player) wears sangmo (hat with feathers or strings attached); others wear gokkal (conical hat). A farmer’s music troupe is composed of yonggi (dragon flag), nonggi (farmers’ flag), long soenabal (trumpet), samul [four percussion instruments, i.e., two kkwaenggwari (small gongs), two jing (large gongs), two buk (drums), and four janggo (hourglass-shaped drums)], beopgo (Buddhist drum), japsaek [referring to a group composed of yangban (nobleman), daeposu (drummer), jorijung (masked clown), changbu (male clown), gaksi (young girl), hwadong (young girl) and mudong (dancing boys)]. The local farmers’ music has many versions according to different occasions: maegut (village ritual held on new Year's Eve on the lunar calendar), madang bapgi, dangsanjegut (rite to village guardians), duregut (performance for villagers’ unity), and pangut (entertainment-oriented performance). Among them, Pangut showcases the best artistic quality. The Yeongsan rhythms contained in the local farmer’s music in Imsil are slow with have many variations, such as gajin yeongsan, dadeuraegi yeongsan, mijigi yeongsan, jaeneomgi yeongsan, gunyeong nori yeongsan, etc. The local farmer’s music in Pilbong, Imsil features clear-cut rhythms of kkwaenggwari (small gongs), powerful/gallant rhythms, and emphasis on teamwork rather than individuals’ skills.
  • 2000.10.19
    designated date
    Sajikdaeje is a national rite given to the god of land and grain, while Sajik means the god of land, and Jik means the god of grain. In ancient times, when a country was established, a ritual was held to pray for the people to live comfortably in the land and grain gods. The memorial service for the resignation, which has been held since the Three Kingdoms Period, offers a glimpse into our ancestors' gratitude for nature.

    King Taejo of the Joseon Dynasty established Jongmyo Shrine and Sajikdan Altar (Historic Site No. 121) along with the royal palace to set up Jongmyo Shrine on the east side of Gyeongbokgung Palace, Sajikdan Altar on the west, and Sajikdan Altar in each province to pray for the comfort and good harvest of the people. Sajikdan has assigned divisions (Taesasin and Futosin) and direct divisions (Tajiksin and Hujiksin) to the east and west). The ancestral tablets of Taiji and Taijik face north to the south of the Dansang, the huto god to the left of the Taoist god, and the latter to the left of Taijiksin.

    Usually, ancestral rites were held in February and August, and a rain ritual was held in the event of a major national crisis or drought. The procedures and formalities for holding ancestral rites have changed little by little over time, but gradually we moved away from the stage of imitating the Chinese ways and had our own examples. Various kinds of grain including raw meat of cattle, pigs, and sheep are prepared today, and the rituals are held in the order of spirits, emperors, jinchan, choheonrye, aheonrye, Jongheonrye, Eokbokrye, Cheolbyeondu, Songsin, and Mangye (Mangye).

    The music, dance, food, clothing, and rituals used in Sajikje, as well as our own ritual procedures for holding rituals, help us understand traditional culture. In 1894 (the 31st year of King Gojong's reign), the system was changed to the new government system, and was abolished by Japan's coercion in the 2nd year of King Sunjong's reign (1908). Since then, it was restored in October 1988 through the testimony of the late Yi Eun-pyo, who was the holder of the Jongmyo Jeryeondae. Currently, the Sajik Daejebongsa Committee, located within the Jeonju Yi Clan, preserves and inherits the Sajik Daeje.

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